gravitational constant


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gravitational constant

Symbol: G . A universal constant that appears in Newton's law of gravitation and is the force of attraction between two bodies of unit mass separated by unit distance. It is equal to 6.672 × 10–11 N m2 kg–2. Predictions that G is decreasing very slightly with time (by less than one part in 1010) are not supported by experimental evidence.

gravitational constant

[‚grav·ə′tā·shən·əl ′kän·stənt]
(mechanics)
The constant of proportionality in Newton's law of gravitation, equal to the gravitational force between any two particles times the square of the distance between them, divided by the product of their masses. Also known as constant of gravitation.
References in periodicals archive ?
where c is speed of light, G is the gravitational constant, [t.
It is equivalent to decrease the gravitational constant in and around the body [17].
where G is the gravitational constant, c is the velocity of light, M is the Earth mass, R is a distance between a center of the Earth and a center of mass of a hydrogen atom (i.
That would change the value of the gravitational constant in the equation relating the gravitational attraction between two masses and the distance between them.
Proposed experiments include a radio beacon orbiting the planet Mercury to detect changes in the gravitational constant, another space-based facility to detect gravitational radiation and a test to study Einstein's general theory of relativity to an accuracy of 1 part in 1 quintillion (10.
G is the universal gravitational constant, c is the speed of light in vacuum and M is the mass of the static homogeneous spherical mass (Schwarzschild's mass) [3, 4].
The Australians who did the original work, Frank Stacey of the University of Queensland in Brisbane and his collaborators, had found that in the mines, Newton's universal gravitational constant appeared slightly larger than the value determined by centuries of measurement in laboratories.
1992) where the dot refers to the derivative with respect to time, G is the gravitational constant, [[rho].
In practice, scientists measure an effective gravitational constant, which, in Newtonhs expression, relates the force of gravity to the masses and the distance between them.
where M is the rest mass of the Sun, G is the universal gravitational constant and c is the speed of light in vacuum.
There has been a long history of anomalies in the measurement of Newton's gravitational constant G, see Fig.
The Missing Measurements of the Gravitational Constant.