gravitational force


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gravitational force

See gravitation.

gravitational force

[‚grav·ə′tā·shən·əl ′fȯrs]
(mechanics)
The force on a particle due to its gravitational attraction to other particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
As shown in Table 1, while twice as many students (16%) gave the correct answer (the normal force of the book on the table) in this case, 68% of the class instead chose, "the gravitational force of the Earth on the book" (and another 10% chose, "the gravitational force of the book on the Earth").
Because spiral galaxies have shapes which can be approximated by a disk, the distribution of matter will directly affect the perceived gravitational force for a mass rotating on such a disk, and the shell theorem does not apply.
Part III then considers the normativity of the gravitational force of federal law and stakes out some of its vices.
Uniformly distributed SiC particles in polymerizing polysulfide epoxy resin were studied for particle velocities under gravitational force using Eq.
Like the gravitational force between Sun and Earth, information between particle A and particle B is also A-Temporal.
Although gravitational force is weaker near Earth's center, the gravitational potential difference is larger.
Now consider the gravitational force between two free space masses m in the center-of-mass (CoM) coordinate frame defined by [mr.
The high tides, which are caused by the gravitational force of the moon when directly overhead, are predicted to affect the entire Welsh coastline, with parts of South Wales around Gower seeing the highest tide.
Over the course of 20 years, the two men wrestle with their inner demons, unable to resist the gravitational force of one another.
By comparing this measurement with the rate of acceleration of a falling glass cube, the team showed that the gravitational force acting on atoms - which are subject to the laws of quantum mechanics - is the same as that acting on familiar objects governed by the classical laws of physics.
On the space station, gravitational force equals only one-millionth of that on Earth.
and painterly" sculptural tendency extending from Picasso through David Smith or that of the Bauhaus tradition, "conceived in terms of pre-planned, usually closed, factory produced (and architecturally modelled) volumes" - in which gravitational force and materiality become secondary to other concerns.