gravitational potential energy


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gravitational potential energy

[‚grav·ə′tā·shən·əl pə¦ten·chəl ′en·ər·jē]
(mechanics)
The energy that a system of particles has by virtue of their positions, equal to the work that must be done against gravitational forces to assemble the particles from some reference configuration, such as mutually infinite separation. Also known as gravitational energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the space is understood to embody the oppositely paired photons, it is easy to envision that space around a body of high energy density houses a radially decreasing energy density, known as the local gravitational potential energy.
One readily sees that the numerator of the exponential term (mgz) is nothing more than the gravitational potential energy of the gas molecules above the surface.
velocity) in the run-up and then using a long pole to convert this energy into gravitational potential energy (i.
The height is proportional to the gravitational potential energy and so the energy can be quantified in units of length, or, if the formula for gravitational potential energy has been covered, the potential energy can be calculated directly.
As the train climbs, it gains gravitational potential energy The higher it climbs, the more energy it stores.
M] is the gravitational potential energy of Sgr A* before the object is accreted,
18), you learned how gravitational potential energy (GPE) and kinetic energy (KE) help a lift-hill coaster move along its track.
The stellar core's iron-peak nuclei decompose into those of helium, which then fragment into neutrons at the price of the star's gravitational potential energy.
0] for G in Newton's formula, the gravitational potential energy Ug stored in a system of masses M and m separated by a distance r can be expressed as:
The higher up he is, the more gravitational potential energy (stored energy due to height) he'll have," says Louis Bloomfield, a physicist at the University of Virginia.
B c r or in other words, when the gravitational potential energy of a particle is much smaller than the rest energy of the particle), we can approximately simplify g as
and the instantaneous relativistic gravitational potential energy ([V.