gravitational tide

gravitational tide

[‚grav·ə′tā·shən·əl ′tīd]
(oceanography)
An atmospheric tide due to gravitational attraction of the sun and moon.
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References in periodicals archive ?
And according to the Harvard astronomers, five of the 11 were ripped off, due to our galaxy's gravitational tides, from a nearby mini-galaxy called the Sagittarius dwarf, which is one among dozens of mini-galaxies that surround the Milky Way.
The simulations reconstruct the chain of events by which a stellar core, similar to the remnant of a tidally disrupted red giant star, might evolve under the gravitational tides of a massive black hole.
Most star clusters in the galactic disk dissolve rapidly, their stars migrating away from each other under the influence of gravitational tides.
This implies that also peaks in the air pressure spectrum for periods shorter then semidiurnal again originate in the thermal changes of the atmosphere and are not caused by the gravitational tides.
Comparing Figures 6 and 9, we see that both the gravitational tides and the air pressure influences the groundwater levels, however, both these forces are independent.
Methone and S/2007 $4 probably didn't initially have the orbits that they do now but fell under the influence of Mimas as gravitational tides exerted by Saturn caused the two small bodies to drift toward the large satellite, says Murray.
The feature appears to be a result of gravitational tides stripping the globular cluster NGC 5466.
The team also looked for signs that the star was stretched into a football shape by gravitational tides from the orbiting planet.
A theory offered by the team to explain the puzzle is that "moonquakes"-- seismic shaking brought on by meteorite impacts or gravitational tides from Earth -- may have caused Shackleton's walls to slough off older, darker soil, revealing newer, brighter soil underneath.
If one such star dived toward our galaxy's central black hole, radiation and gravitational tides would rip apart its disk in a matter of years.
A theory offered by the team to explain the puzzle is that "moonquakes"-seismic shaking brought on by meteorite impacts or gravitational tides from Earth-may have caused Shackleton's walls to slough off older, darker soil, revealing newer, brighter soil underneath.
The center of our galaxy is wracked with powerful gravitational tides that are stirred by a 4 million solar-mass black hole.