gravitational wave


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Related to gravitational wave: Gravitational Radiation, Gravity waves

gravitational wave

[‚grav·ə′tā·shən·əl ′wāv]
(relativity)
A propagating gravitational field predicted by general relativity, which is produced by some change in the distribution of matter; it travels at the speed of light, exerting forces on masses in its path. Also known as gravitational radiation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Observed Gravitational Wave Effects: Amaldi 1980 Frascati-Rome Classical Bar Detectors, 2013 Perth-London Zener-Diode Quantum Detectors, Earth Oscillation Mode Frequencies.
According to Einstein's math, when two massive black holes merge, all of space jiggles like a bowl of Jell-O as gravitational waves race out from the collision at light speed.
Dynamical 3-space: gravitational wave detection and the Shnoll effect, Progress in Physics, 2013, v.
It is hoped that the new detectors will be sensitive to a thousands times greater volume of the universe compared to initial detectors, with even cautious estimates suggesting it will observe dozens of gravitational wave events each year.
When the black holes merge, they emit gravitational waves more strongly in one direction.
The direct measurement of gravitational waves may allow 'listening' back as far as the very first trillionth of a second following the Big Bang: This would give us totally new information about our universe: with gravitational wave astronomy, totally new areas of science will become accessible.
The Institute also helps to operate the distributed computing project Einstein@Home, which searches for gravitational wave signals from pulsars.
cosmic censorship, hoop conjecture, spacetime stability, no hair theorems), but also its interplay with high energy, astro and particle physics (testing the precise nature of the interaction between compact objects and matter --such as dark matter candidates or accretion disks-- and its imprint on gravitational wave emission, understanding gravitational-led turbulence,etc).
Either way the potential value of the gravitational wave signal for understanding the universe is worth the effort, and validates the debate.
These discoveries make the detection and study of gravitational waves particularly simple, and easily extend to a network of detectors, and for the REG technique an international network of such detectors has existed since 1998, and so that data is an extremely valuable to the characterisation of the gravitational wave effect, and also other phenomena which appear to be induced by more extreme fluctuations.