graviton

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Graviton

A theoretically deduced particle postulated as the quantum of the gravitational field. According to Einstein's theory of general relativity, accelerated masses (or other distributions of energy) should emit gravitational waves, just as accelerated charges emit electromagnetic waves. And according to quantum field theory, such a radiation field should be quantized; that is, its energy should appear in discrete quanta, called gravitons, just as the energy of light appears in discrete quanta, namely photons. See Elementary particle, Gravitation, Quantum field theory, Relativity

graviton

(grav -ă-ton) See gravitational waves; quantum gravitation.

graviton

[′grav·ə‚tän]
(physics)
A theoretically deduced particle postulated as the quantum of the gravitational field, having a rest mass and charge of zero and a spin of 2.
References in periodicals archive ?
The gravitons would then form "strings," and such strings, which would tether them together, could connect gravitating masses.
He then briefly suggests that PK could be effected via the emission of gravitons from shadow matter copies of an agent's brain that has traveled into proximity to the object.
This particle, known as the graviton, had not been discovered, and is only hypothesized.
Also, not being strictly massless, gravitons (spin s=2) should have 2s + 1 = 5 polarization states instead of the two conventionally assumed helicity states if massless.
When gravitons, the particles that mediate gravitation attraction, escape the local brane, the gravitational force that remains within the brane diminishes.
Such an approach in [22] involving a time-dependent isospin rotation U(t) and unification with spin0 gravitons yielded pimesons
In other words, just the force-carrying particles of gravity, called gravitons, could travel in the space-time beyond the brane, leaving the other forces confined to the brane.
Then in Section 28, we show that the quantized energies of gravitons can be identified as dark energy.
For example, it would be instructive to devise the relationship between the vector field g(x) and the 4-potential of electromagnetic field A(x) and to consider the local perturbations of g(x) as gravitons or/and photons.
Cold dark matter has to be fairly exotic: magnetic monopoles, axions or gravitons, none of which has ever been found by experimenters, although theorists believe they exist (SN:6/23/84, p.
z Now, we may suppose that these gravitons move in a curved space with the metric g.
The vacuum energy of the vacuum core comes from the gravitons in the exterior region surrounding the hedge gluon force field as in the Chapline's dark energy star.