gravity wave


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gravity wave

[′grav·əd·ē ‚wāv]
(fluid mechanics)
A wave at a gas-liquid interface which depends primarily upon gravitational forces, surface tension and viscosity being of secondary importance.
A wave in a fluid medium in which restoring forces are provided primarily by buoyancy (that is, gravity) rather than by compression.
References in periodicals archive ?
I had proof positive that these 200 MHz energy bursts were not from 200 MHz gravity waves.
This solution choice allows us to define the uniform asymptotics for internal gravity wave fields propagating within stratified mediums with slowly varying parameters, which holds true either near or far away from the wave fronts of a single wave mode.
An atmospheric gravity wave excited at a low altitude propagates upward and reaches an altitude at which its horizontal phase speed becomes equal to the horizontal background wind speed in the direction of propagation.
Later this year, European partners of the LIGO collaboration plan to restart their revamped gravity wave observatory, Advanced VIRGO, near Pisa, Italy, providing a crucial third ultrasensitive detector for pinpointing gravity wave sources.
While indirect evidence for gravity waves was obtained by studying the changing orbital period of a neutron star binary, resulting in the 1993 Nobel Prize in Physics, gravity waves have yet to be directly observed.
Although many aspects of gravity waves still remain to be clarified, such as their interaction with turbulence in the stable boundary layer (SBL), wave transport and mixing, etc, there exists a strong theoretical framework (i.
The discovery was surprising because the properties of gravity waves and acoustic waves differ greatly, in both length and time scales.
Detectable rumbles emanate from the most violent events the universe has to offer--such as the ferocious encounter of two massive black holes (recorded by two gravity wave observatories) merging in a fateful embrace about 1.
NASA SPoRT also released infrared footage of the gravity waves spilling out from the deep convection currents in the storm.
SOLAR ASTRONOMERS might finally have detected the effect of gravity waves in our star's core, revealing that the Sun's central region rotates about four times faster than its outer layers.