gray goods

gray goods

[′grā ‚gu̇dz]
(textiles)
Cloths of any color that have been woven in a loom but have not been otherwise treated in dry- or wet-finishing operations. Also known as greige goods.
References in periodicals archive ?
it may only brand-new goods, which are offered and delivered via authorized by the respective manufacturers reference path (no re-imported goods, no gray goods and no rm products rm-remanufactured ).
These products can be untreated gray goods, or coated with silicone, PTFE, or neoprene.
Pompei Chairman Vincent Wong reported that their virtual sales of gray goods have increased around 20 percent each month at the TMall site [Chiu and Chu 2014].
This note outlines a history of the regulation of imported gray goods pursuant to Trademark Law, illustrating legislative efforts and judicial support in curbing the importation of goods unintended for the United States market.
While the stores I visited featured legitimate licensed merchandise, exactly what was licensed for Croatia and what consisted of gray goods would have been difficult for anyone but the licensor and licensee to evaluate.
Rather, gray goods are genuine in terms of their manufacturer, but their distribution is unauthorized.
Gone as well are the gray goods that sometimes sent mixed messages to customers and employees alike.
Manufacturers can react by refusing to service gray goods and disenfranchising channel offenders (such as jobbers who sell to unauthorized distributors).
1) Gray goods are genuine goods sold through unauthorized channels in direct competition with authorized distributors.
Lush constructions in wovens are dominated by chenille jacquards and tapestries, and prints show up in a variety of gray goods like linens and linen blends, shantung and duck cloths that add texture and depth to the designs.
The first step toward dealing with gray goods is for a company to religiously register its trademarks.
It can also serve as an independent basis for Customs to stop the importation of counterfeits and gray goods.