grayling

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grayling,

common name for a brilliantly colored fish belonging to the genus Thymallus, of the family Salmonidae (salmonsalmon
, member of the Salmonidae, a family of marine fish that spawn in freshwater, including the salmons, the trouts, and the chars (subfamily Salmoninae), the whitefish and the ciscoes (subfamily Coregoninae), and the grayling (subfamily Thymallinae).
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 family), and closely allied to the smelt. Graylings are found chiefly in clear, cold, fresh waters of the Northern Hemisphere. They average 1 ft (30 cm) in length and 1 lb (.45 kg) in weight and exhibit hues of silver, gold, violet, blue, and olive brown. The arctic grayling, which can reach more than 8 lb (3.6 kg), was found in Michigan and Montana as well as Canada, Alaska, and Siberia, but the Michigan population is now extinct. The genus name, Thymallus, refers to the odor of wild thyme characteristic of the delicious flesh of fresh specimens. Graylings are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Actinopterygii, order Salmoniformes, family Salmonidae, subfamily Thymallinae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grayling seems desperate to reach out to those he believes are lost in an intellectual fog of their own making, his aim to lend a hand and pull them out.
Grayling leans against the wall casually, stretching out his legs before responding with an assured brand of optimism: "It seems to me that in five or ten thousand years' time, when people look back (if there are any people) at this period of history, the two or three thousand years when Judeo-Christian influence in the world was considerable, they will collapse it down to a sentence.
Grayling pauses briefly, before launching into another gem in his immensely vibrant stash of anecdotes and references: "There's a writer, a man called J.
As long as religion rules the roost, however, Grayling acknowledges that we can only undermine it inchmeal.
Dealing with plurality, then, is perhaps the greatest challenge that faces modern civilization, but Grayling doesn't believe the solution is multiculturalism.
Grayling continues, with his characteristic passion for all things discursive, "that the French have banned the face veil, and the Germans have just banned circumcision.
What strikes me as extraordinary about Grayling is his lack of fear, intellectual or moral.
It's an ugly situation, though, and one that Grayling does nothing to pretty up.