green fluorescent protein


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green fluorescent protein

[¦grēn flə¦res·ənt ′prō‚tēn]
(cell and molecular biology)
A protein that is produced by the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria ; used to trace the synthesis, location, and movement of proteins of interest in cell biology research. Abbreviated GFP.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps it's fitting that green fluorescent protein (GFP), the substance that lights up jellyfish, turns out to look just like a can of paint.
Amersham Pharmacia Biotech and Aurora Biosciences Corporation today announced an agreement to commercialize their combined Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) technology which is used to accelerate drug discovery and development.
The USC researchers tracked development of cold sensing through mice genetically engineered to express a green fluorescent protein whenever TRPM8 was produced.
Aurora Biosciences Corporation (Nasdaq: ABSC) announced today that it has signed a non-exclusive license agreement with Wyeth-Ayerst Research, a division of American Home Products Corporation (NYSE: AHP), for Aurora's proprietary green fluorescent protein ("GFP") mutant technology for specified genomics technologies and other applications.
The researchers took the gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP), a glowing molecule used by jellyfish, and inserted it into single-celled zebrafish embryos.
By fusing a green fluorescent protein to the AMPA receptors, he was able to track their movements, using microscopic technology.
Using a genetically modified mouse model, the researchers tagged stem cells with green fluorescent protein (GFP), which exhibits bright green fluorescence during gene expression and can be easily seen under a microscope.
They took the gene for a histone, one of the cellular proteins around which DNA wraps itself, and joined it to the gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP), a jellyfish molecule that lights up when excited by a laser.
BioImage is based around its proprietary redistribution concept, which comprises of technologies for observation of protein movements within living cells, of which an important tool is the widely used Green Fluorescent Protein, on which the company holds a strong patent position.
The PathHunter platform allows scientists to detect protein trafficking without any form of imaging features and it is highly cost effective, that is, the cost involved is only a fraction of the cost involved in using the normal green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based assays.
Green fluorescent protein (GFP), once only known to the jellyfish that produce it, has been successfully cloned and has risen to the forefront of biomolecular research in the past few years.
Dr Jorg Wiedenmann, Senior Lecturer of Biological Oceanography and Head of the University's Coral Reef Laboratory, who led the study says: "The beautiful pink and purple hues that are produced by the coral host are often evoked by chromoproteins; pigments that are biochemically related to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria.