green manure


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green manure

[¦grēn mə′nü·ər]
(agriculture)
Herbaceous plant material plowed into the soil while still green.

green manure

Green herbaceous plants plowed under to benefit the soil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Compared to tithonia green manure applied at either of the two levels, tithonia gave a better performance than poultry manure, partly because it had more time to decompose and release nitrogen to the soil.
Comfrey, field beans and sunflowers may be used as green manure plants along with winter rye grows well in very cold zones and should be ready to turn under in early spring.
Now there was no way that green manure was going on my new garden bed.
The bacteria involved in decomposing green manure temporarily rob soil of nitrogen, so if you've used a nonleguminous crop, wait a few weeks before planting or apply a nitrogen fertilizer.
If you would like to learn more about how to use green manures in your garden, there is a talk by Rachel Crow in HDRA's Vegetable Kingdom on Thursday, August 26.
Using of biological fertilizers and NPK in green manure plots compared to the control plots had higher accumulation of nitrogen in seeds (Figure 2).
The plot is looking good and all the remaining green manure has been dug back into the soil and this is left to the winter's devices to work it back into the soil to increase its fertility.
Moreover, the data (Table 3) indicated that green manure application increased shoot weight, leaf weight and cob length of corn leaf compared to the control.
Where this type of green manure is used it is advisable to grow leafy crops immediately after so that they can use some of this excess of nitrogen.
Perfect plot Improve the fertility of your vegetable plot by sowing a green manure such as lupin and mustard seed, available from The Organic Gardening Catalogue (0845 130 1304).
1kg from the fallow plot, 21kg after the green manure and no less than 30.