grip safety


Also found in: Acronyms.

grip safety

[′grip ¦sāf·tē]
(ordnance)
Safety mechanism that prevents a gun from being fired unless the stock is firmly grasped while the trigger is pulled; used mainly on automatic pistols.
References in periodicals archive ?
The beavertail grip safety has a cutout to receive the back of the hammer while allowing it to ride as high as possible and it also has a very slight memory bump to make sure the grip safety is depressed when firing.
In terms of operating controls, that means a wide thumb safety and a hammer-cupping beavertail grip safety to eliminate hammer bite, with a checkered memory bump on the base of the grip safety to ensure operation, even with a slightly misaligned grasp.
A number of the two Ultra+ pistols' small components, such as the hammer, sear, disconnector, grip safety, extended ambidextrous manual safety (which is similar in configuration to the famous King ambidextrous safety), slide release and rear sight assembly, are made by means of a process called Metal-Injection-Molding(MIM), which was developed by NASA and first used by Kimber in the Model 82.
Other Nighthawk "standard" features include an extended tactical magazine release, a 10mm extended ejector, highrise Beavertail grip safety, extra-power firing pin spring, forged fully-machined slide stop, Nighthawk Custom tool steel sear and hammer, and hex head grip screws and bushings.
Other extras on the "Enhanced" R1 include a beavertail grip safety, a wider manual safety lever, front grip serrations and an enhanced hammer.
One critical addition, especially for those of us who grew up shooting with a grip so high it's almost off the pistol, is a hammer-cupping beavertail grip safety with a speed bump.
What is unusual is the gun has a wider than normal hammer, extended grip safety, which matches the hammer, lowered ejection port and a beveled mag well which attaches under the lower screws of the grip panels.
The grip safety is provided by the soft one-piece handle, which is manufactured in the same material as the ball.
While the original GI grip safety is undoubtedly more authentic, the beavertail-type grip safety now seen on every 1911 but "retro" versions was developed because the GI type just plain hurts the web of your hand if you do much shooting at all.
For some, it's added security: Holstering or drawing with their thumb at the rear of the slide keeps the grip safety "on," preventing unintended discharge if something interdicts the trigger.
The upswept beavertail grip safety is generous, very nicely enhancing your grip, and has a pronounced "memory bump" for sure engagement.
Safety Features: DFI Trigger Safety, Grip Safety, Foregrip Safety Wings