grisaille


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to grisaille: Zeuxis and Parrhasius

grisaille

(grĭzī`, –zāl`, Fr. grēzä`yə), a monochrome painting and drawing technique executed in tones of gray. Such works were often produced in the Renaissance to simulate sculpture, as in Uccello's equestrian portrait of Sir John Hawkswood (Cathedral of Florence). Painters of stained glass frequently used grisaille. In the 17th cent. grisaille was prized for interior decoration.

Grisaille

 

a kind of decorative painting executed in various shades of some one color (most often gray). Grisaille dates from the 17th century and is widely used in interior murals of the classic style that are mainly imitations of sculptured reliefs (for example, in palaces in the cities of Pushkin and Pavlovsk, in the auditorium of the old building of Moscow University, and in the 18th-century palaces in Ostankino and Kuskovo). Grisaille is also the name applied to paintings in monochrome enamel (gray, brown, pink) with some elements of gold, in which a sculptured effect is achieved.

grisaille

[grə′zī]
(graphic arts)
A technique of painting to imitate a bas-relief and done in shades of gray.
All methods of painting in which full modeling is done in black and white or other contrasting tones, and then finished by the application of transparent glazes.
(textiles)
A poplin-type fabric in salt-and-pepper gray with printed warp and coarse filling that imparts a texture.

grisaille

1. A system of painting in grey tints of various shades; used either for decoration or to represent objects, as in relief.
2. A stained glass window executed according to this method.
References in periodicals archive ?
The former, a grisaille in the Lugt Collection in Paris, was frequently copied by both of Bruegel's sons, Jan and Pieter II.
Richly illustrated with color photographs and drawings, this manual offers step-by-step instructions for creating trompe l'oeil works using the technique of grisaille.
Lining the hall walls are six stone niches originally designed for the setting of the Arundel marbles, while grisaille wall murals by decorative artist Sir James Thornhill depict the triumph of King Cyrus.
light, colour, shape, line, plane, space, grisaille, chiaroscuro, etching are not approximated in language but brought to mind.
Sometimes they painted monochromatically, a tradition called grisaille, and Climent, too, often employs shades of gray to render not only snapshots, but more recently also exterior vistas that seem bleak, dead, lost in time.
00) finished behind En Grisaille at Catterick but never really recovered from a tardy start.
The flight into Egypt is humourously alluded to by fleeing figures in grisaille at the base of Herod's throne (one figure pulls on an ass who refuses to budge).
The white surface of the work imitated both the Royal Academician William Mulready's wet white technique and Jan van Eyck's grisaille figures on the Ghent altarpiece that Rossetti had seen that year.
Here, two less well-known manuscripts are selected for extended treatment, the lavishly illuminated twelfth-century Terence from St Albans, and Thomas Chaundler's curious academic drama the Liber apologeticus, whose delicate grisaille miniatures are otherwise only reproduced in a relatively inaccessible Roxburghe Club publication.
Appealing, too, is the enamel medallion painted in grisaille around 1540 by Leonard Limosin (Fig.
Dans certains quartiers d'Alger, des jeunes semblent vouloir rompre avec la grisaille et donner plus de couleurs a l'espace ou ils vivent.
Singer's paintings testify to her great fascination with the visual rhetoric of the historical avant-gardes by reactivating the formal aesthetics of Constructivism, Futurism, and Vorticism and the somber palette of grisaille.