grizzly bear


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grizzly bear

or

grizzly,

large, powerful North American brown bearbear,
large mammal of the family Ursidae in the order Carnivora, found almost exclusively in the Northern Hemisphere. Bears have large heads, bulky bodies, massive hindquarters, short, powerful limbs, very short tails, and coarse, thick fur.
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, characterized by gray-streaked, or grizzled, fur. Grizzlies are 6 to 8 ft (180–250 cm) long, stand 3 1-2 to 4 ft (105–120 cm) at the humped shoulder, and weigh up to 800 lb (360 kg). Primarily omnivorous, they are excellent hunters and prey on large mammals such as deer; they relish ants and other insects and depend on plants, roots, and berries to supplement their diet. Once widespread in the western half of North America, from the Arctic Circle to central Mexico, habitat destruction and hunters nearly exterminated the grizzly. Classified as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, small groups can be found in protected regions of Alaska, W Canada, and the U.S. Rocky Mts. The grizzly is a subspecies, Ursus arctos horribilis, of the brown bear, U. arctos, which has small populations throughout North America and N Eurasia; it can crossbreed in the wild and captivity with the polar bearpolar bear,
large white bear, Ursus maritimus, formerly Thalarctos maritimus, of the coasts of arctic North America, Asia, and Europe. Polar bears usually live on drifting pack ice, but sometimes wander long distances inland.
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. It is classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Carnivora, family Ursidae.

grizzly bear

[′griz·lē ‚ber]
(vertebrate zoology)
The common name for a number of species of large carnivorous mammals in the genus Ursus, family Ursidae.

grizzly bear

a variety of the brown bear, Ursus arctos horribilis, formerly widespread in W North America; its brown fur has cream or white hair tips on the back, giving a grizzled appearance Often shortened to grizzly
References in periodicals archive ?
The failure to implement the Grizzly Bear Conservation Strategy follows over two decades of failure by the BC government to act to ensure the survival of grizzly bears.
The chances for maintaining healthy wolf and grizzly bear habitat in the lower forty-eight states, for example, remain bleak as the large roadless areas they need for survival have shrunk to about 1 percent of their historic range.
Currently, the Hudepohl-Schoenling grant money is helping develop a computer model of a grizzly bear life-cycle.
NYSE: FDX), is kicking off the holidays with a special delivery of three orphaned grizzly bears heading to their new home at the Detroit Zoo.
The photos reportedly show a grizzly bear grazing rather than acting aggressively, although hikers are told to stay at least one-quarter of a mile away from the bears.
The wrongful death lawsuit alleges the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST), responsible for long-term bear research in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, removed warning signs near the research site three days early and in violation of federal protocols.
The mama grizzly bear in me comes out, makes me want to rear up on my hind legs and say, 'Wait a minute,'" she added.
Ed would call him Grizzly Bear as a nickname and when they broke up Ed wrote the album Horn of Plenty.
But how do we know if they're grizzly bear droppings?
It's all of these systems aligned that allow the grizzly bear to be healthy and present," says Louisa Wilcox, a grizzly bear expert with the Natural Resources Defense Council.
Cathy Kuehl, of the Old Home Day Committee, and Bernie Chabot, of the Charlton Council on Aging, coordinated what has become known as the Grizzly Bear Project.
The rapid demise of this animal in California only took about seventy-five years, from a time prior to the Gold Rush, when the estimated number of grizzly bears was about 10,000, to the last known grizzly bear which was spotted in Sequoia National Park in 1924.