groom

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groom

1. a person employed to clean and look after horses
2. any of various officers of a royal or noble household
References in classic literature ?
So I told him of my escape and of my fortunate meeting with the king's grooms, and how kindly I had been received at the palace.
Green at that very time about your mother's dairymaid, by her desire, and had promised John Groom to write to Mrs.
The eight guards, who concluded their service for the day was over, laid themselves down very comfortably in the sun upon some stone benches; the grooms disappeared with their horses into the stables, and, with the exception of a few joyous birds, startling each other with their sharp chirping in the tufted shrubberies, it might have been thought that the whole castle was as soundly asleep as Monsieur was.
About half-past six, however, the grooms began to come down to air their masters' horses--first one, and then another, till there were some dozen horses and five or six riders: but that need not trouble me, for they would not come as far as the low rocks which I was now approaching.
Many were the colloquies into which Sam entered with grooms who were airing horses on roads, and nursemaids who were airing children in lanes; but nothing could Sam elicit from either the first-mentioned or the last, which bore the slightest reference to the object of his artfully-prosecuted inquiries.
The groom took her up in his arms and carried her out to his sledge and tucked her under the blankets.
Into this fine box the groom put me; it was clean, sweet, and airy.
He jumped from the cart, and having told the groom to take the mare home, made his way towards his guest through the withered bracken and rough undergrowth.
Then feed us and break us and handle and groom, And give us good riders and plenty of room, And launch us in column of squadron and see The way of the war-horse to "Bonnie Dundee"!
A groom was rubbing them down; near them were saddles and bridles.
You must go straight on till you come to the castle where the horse stands in his stall: by his side will lie the groom fast asleep and snoring: take away the horse quietly, but be sure to put the old leathern saddle upon him, and not the golden one that is close by it.
Having left that soldier who was evidently drunk, Rostov stopped the horse of a batman or groom of some important personage and began to question him.