ground elder


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ground elder

ground elder

A food source imported into England by the Romans that got out of control. Also called Bishop’s weed, has white flower clusters like poison hemlock, but leaves are very different, more like an Elder (but unrelated). Small white 5-petal flowers. Very invasive nuisance plant that takes over other plants, even a tiny piece of root left in ground grows new plants, making this is a limitless food source. All aboveground parts are edible (not roots) Young leaves used as salad greens. Pinch off pre-flowering bugs to keep leaves more nutritious. Plant is diuretic and laxative. Used medicinally for gout, arthritis, rheumatism, bladder disorders. Has triangular stem (no toxic lookalike does)
References in periodicals archive ?
Ground elder will be weakened with persistent hoeing, but that won't kill it.
Persistent weeds like bindweed and ground elder are never added to compost heaps unless hot enough to destroy them.
Alan Titchmarsh bemoans the scourge of Japanese knotweed, while Hannah Stephenson lists ground elder and couch grass as her main enemies I CAUGHT up with Alan Titchmarsh at the BBC Gardeners' World Live show when he was giving advice on how to combat Japanese knotweed, the peril of many gardeners, a weed which is right up there on the list of seemingly indestructible thugs.
ERIC ROBSON, CHAIRMAN: "I've joked about it lots in the past but in 2011 I'm going to found the Ground Elder Appreciation Society.
No sooner have you weeded the beds and borders during a fine spell, than you'll have to do it again following a downpour, as seedlings emerge and difficult perennial weeds such as ground elder, couch grass and bindweed do their worst, climbing up plants or spreading their underground roots so they are virtually impossible to eradicate.
Ominous bindweed stems are appearing where I thought I'd got rid of it last year, and ground elder is appearing feet away from where it was.
Weeds can be mixed with grass cuttings, but avoid vigorous perennial types with indestructible roots such as ground elder or couch grass.
QI'VE inherited a border infested with ground elder.
Outside I can hear the ground elder mocking me as it smothers the flower beds.
Without this some real garden 'thugs' like ground elder is able to transform an herbaceous border into a nightmare, entangling itself in the roots of plants to the extent it can only ever be removed by digging them all up and starting again after picking out the elder.
But rather than throwing in a handful of parsley, I grab some ground elder from the garden for added flavour.