ground frost

(redirected from ground frosts)
Also found in: Dictionary.

ground frost

[′grau̇nd ‚frȯst]
(meteorology)
In British usage, a freezing condition injurious to vegetation, which is considered to have occurred when a minimum thermometer exposed to the sky at a point just above a grass surface records a temperature (grass temperature) of 30.4°F (-0.9°C) or below.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A BRACE of inspections will take place today but a Met Office spokesman said yesterday that the days of worrying about ground frosts could soon be over.
Surprisingly, despite this February's bright sunshine, there were 20 ground frosts during the month, with only nine nights frost-free - the highest incidence of February ground frost in the city since 1996.
Growers are expecting the peach crop to be down 15% at 380,000 tonnes as a result of late ground frosts and unusually wet conditions earlier in the blossom season.
We are beginning to get occasional ground frosts now.
The arrival of autumn ground frosts and dews also marks the annual return of mice and other rodents from enjoying their summers outside to start nest building within the warmth of buildings.
Brian Gaze, of The Weather Oumgr o Outlook, said: "A polar plume means very chilly nights and ground frosts, with a chance of 0degC in parts of the North.
On Thursday night into Friday it could get down to as low as -10C in some places with hard ground frosts.
And the Bank Holiday weekend looks no better with falling temperatures and the far North seeing the first ground frosts of the season.
There was the highest number of ground frosts since 1997.
Extremes of temperature marked the main trend for the month, with two ground frosts, more than in 2004, when there was one, and 2003, when there were none.
But the nights were colder, with 18 ground frosts recorded.
Forecasters are even predicting ground frosts for the week ahead as cold fronts across the country bring rain and gales.