ground state

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Ground state

In quantum mechanics, the stationary state of lowest energy of a particle or a system of particles. The ground state may be bound or unbound; when bound, its energy generally is a finite amount less than the energy of the next higher or first excited state. In the typical circumstance that the potential energy is zero at infinite separation, the magnitude of the negative ground-state energy is the binding energy, that is, the energy required to separate all the particles infinitely. See Energy level (quantum mechanics), Excited state, Nuclear binding energy

ground state

See energy level.

ground state

[′grau̇nd ‚stāt]
(quantum mechanics)
The stationary state of lowest energy of a particle or a system of particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this work, a special emphasis is given to the following issue: Contrary to a naive expectation, even the ground state of a simple atom is written as a sum of more than one configuration.
Here the neutron and the proton correspond to the ground state of [sup.
Hence, the second line of table 1 shows the ground state of the [I.
Hence, the outer shell of these two nuclear states consists of three identical fermions which make the required ground state.
The observed lineshapes are understood as a Lorentzian profile convolved with the thermal distribution of the ground state collision energies (6).
Fplf[alpha]] is the electronic optical transition matrix element between the ground state labeled by Fplf[alpha] and the exc ited state labeled by F'p'[beta].
The theory which underlies our calculation of the spectrum involves three major pieces: the ground state wavefunctions, the excited state wavefunctions and the molecular Rabi matrix which gives the optical coupling between them.
This mechanism is provided by a wave that can propagate over the whole of the ordered region of the ground state with SBS.
In the second atom an excited electron drops into its ground state with the emission of visible light.
The electron cannot return to its original ground state from this new position.
Phosphorescence, in the strict sense, involves an intermediate excited state, from which emission, created by an electron dropping into the ground state, has a very low probability.
Exposing such a confined particle to a pulse of laser light of precisely the right wavelength and duration can readily kick it into an excited energy state; a second laser pulse can restore it to its ground state.