ground-based navigation aid

ground-based navigation aid

[′grau̇nd ‚bāst ‚nav·ə′gā·shən ‚ād]
(navigation)
That portion of a navigation system which is located on the ground and emits signals or receives them from crafts or vehicles; these signals provide the navigation information.
References in periodicals archive ?
Performance Technologies' Advanced Managed Platform(TM) is utilized in building the ground-based navigation aid to compare the GPS information with the station's surveyed location, and identify errors in GPS, then links that information to the VHF transmitters for broadcast to airplanes.
Both have embarked on a global initiative to assist airports with redesigning the airways within their airspace to allow them to move away from legacy ground-based navigation aids and to PBN procedures.
The RNP AR procedure allows aircraft to automatically fly accurate trajectories without relying on ground-based navigation aids, optimises airspace utilisation and reduces diversions in difficult weather conditions.
It improves safety and reliability in all weather, and reduces reliance on ground-based navigation aids.
RNP uses GPS to help pilots optimise flight approach and departure tracks containing curves and vertical profiles that could not be flown accurately using ground-based navigation aids, says Qantas's group executive for government and corporate affairs, David Epstein.
PBN uses specialised equipment on board the aircraft to fly a defined path independent of ground-based navigation aids.
This technology, pioneered by Alaska Airlines in Juneau, allows aircraft to fly safer, more reliable landings and reduces reliance on ground-based navigation aids.
GAGAN is one of several systems being deployed around the world as part of an initiative endorsed by the International Civil Aviation Organization to help civil aircraft transition to satellite-based signals from ground-based navigation aids.
But when they fly into low-visibility conditions like fog, rain, snow and blowing sand, pilots have difficulty making a safe approach and landing without ground-based navigation aids.
Because RNP paths rely on satellite-based navigation technology, the airline does not have to rely on the outdated, ground-based navigation aids in place at the airport, improving schedule reliability.
The new approach allows aircraft to automatically fly accurate trajectories without depending on ground-based navigation aids, optimizes airspace utilisation and reduces diversions in difficult weather conditions.
PBN utilises specialised equipment on-board aircraft to fly a defined path independent of ground-based navigation aids.

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