ground-probing radar

ground-probing radar

[¦graünd ¦prōb·iŋ ′rā‚där]
(engineering)
A nondestructive technique using electromagnetic waves to locate objects or interfaces buried beneath the earth's surface or located within a visually opaque structure. Also known as ground-penetrating radar; subsurface radar; surface-penetrating radar.
References in periodicals archive ?
His work contributed to the development of a ground-probing radar device for detecting mines.
The Swiss-built Easylocator uses ground-probing radar to locate pipework, cutting digging times and avoiding accidental strikes on underground pipes.
Ground-probing radar systems typically comprise an antenna with a transmitter and receiver in close proximity, connected to a control unit that generates radio pulses and records the reflected signals.
It is distinctly possible therefore that, like the development of airborne radar systems, ground-probing radar could rapidly develop into a vital tool for the efficient operation of airports in the not too distant future.
The RRAMNS system integrates ground-probing radar, metal detection and forward-looking infrared imaging with a mine-protected vehicle, said Tom McNiff, a company spokesman.
Information gathered by ground-probing radar, or special rods, is stored on compact disks, then used to programme directional drills.
Ground-probing radar, which can identify plastics and fibre-optic cables, is used for other areas.
He said yesterday: "I used our ground-probing radar to recover pounds 144,000 in the Stephanie Slater case, as well as pinpointing firearms, buried cash and bodies.
Since the time-varying nature of ground-probing radar impulses is strongest in the near field region, within about 1 wavelength of the transmitter, the near field region with a low-frequency antenna may encompass important shallow features which are desired to be imaged.