group selection


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group selection

[¦grüp si¦lek·shən]
(evolution)
Selection in which changes in gene frequency are brought about by the differential extinction and proliferation of the local population.
References in periodicals archive ?
At present, empirical guidance on the valuation performance of multiples whose peer group selection was based on optimal, sector-specific, PGVs does not exist.
They insisted that everything group selection tried to explain could be better explained by principles like kin selection and reciprocal altruism.
Wilson devotes a chapter to demonstrating the "equivalence" between Hamilton's kinship-based theory of "inclusive fitness" and Price's theory of group selection.
The nonprogressive character of the debate between the proponents of inclusive fitness and the proponents of group selection can be attributed in good part to the false alternatives offered in the formula repeated by Wilson and Wilson.
Group selection departs from the more familiar model of individual selection that sees the evolutionary prize going to the individual, male or female, who has more surviving offspring, regardless of health and lifespan, much less altruism.
A group selection harvest method that creates smaller openings of about an acre in size that are then planted can be a viable option (York et al.
All eyes will be on Mary Kom in two-day core group selection trials, as she bids to impress the selectors.
Wilson explains this tense balance in human social life as exhibiting the countervailing evolutionary forces of individual selection and group selection.
While previous rejection of group selection itself was due in part to conceptual issues, one could also point out the prevailing individualist social sentiment, "selfish gene" mentality and unrelenting hostility against those who supported the view that group selection did indeed apply to humans and not just to insects.
Peer group selection traditionally was a relatively simple process, in which companies focused on finding 10-20 firms of similar size and industry.
As such, the process of peer group selection is under considerable scrutiny by securities regulators and shareholder activists.
Having laid out the precepts of his work, Nowak discusses five ways to solve the Dilemma; from direct reciprocity (tit for tat), to indirect reciprocity (the power of reputation), spatial games (chessboard of life), group selection (tribal wars) and kin selection (nepotism).

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