Grout

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grout

[grau̇t]
(materials)
A fluid mixture of cement and water, or a mixture of cement, sand, and water.
Waste material of all sizes obtained in quarrying stone.

Grout

Mortar containing a considerable amount of water so that it has the consistency of a viscous liquid, permitting it to be poured or pumped into joints, spaces, and cracks within masonry walls and floors.

Grout

A binding or structural agent used in construction and engineering applications. Grout is typically a mixture of hydraulic cement and water, with or without fine aggregate; however, chemical grouts are also produced. See Cement

The type most commonly specified in construction and engineering is cementitious grout, which is used where its more conventional sister material, concrete, is less suited because of placing limitations or restrictions on coarse-aggregate contents. Cementitious grouts are used to fill voids and cracks in pavements, building and dam foundations, and brick and concrete masonry wall assemblies; to construct floor toppings or provide flooring underlayment; to place ceramic tile; and to bind preplaced-aggregate concrete. See Concrete

Grout can be formulated from a variety of cements and minerals and proportioned for specific applications. Neat cement grout refers to formulations without aggregate, containing only hydraulic cement, water, and possibly admixtures. Sanded grout is any mix containing fine aggregate and it is formulated much like masonry mortar. Whether neat or sanded, cementitious grouts derive their strength and other properties from the same calcium silicate-based binding chemistry as concrete.

grout

1. Mortar containing a considerable amount of water so that it has the consistency of a viscous liquid, permitting it to be poured or pumped into joints, spaces, and cracks within masonry walls and floors, between pieces of ceramic clay, slate, and floor tile, and into the joints between preformed roof deck units.
2. In foundation work, mixtures of cement, cement-sand, clay, or chemicals; used to fill voids in granular soils, usually by a process of successive injection through drilled holes.
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