growth factor


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Related to growth factor: growth hormone, Fibroblast growth factor, Epidermal growth factor

Growth factor

Any of a group of biologically active poly-peptides which function as hormonelike regulatory signals, controlling the growth and differentiation of responsive cells. Indeed, the distinction between growth factors and hormones is frequently arbitrary and stems more from the manner of their discovery than from a clear difference in function. See Cell differentiation, Hormone

The sequence of amino acids has been determined for several growth-factor polypeptides. This information permits a number of growth factors to be placed into families, members of which have related amino acid sequences, suggesting that they evolved from a single ancestral protein. The insulin family comprises somatemedins A and C, insulin, insulinlike growth factor (IGF), and multiplication-stimulating factor (MSF). A second family consists of sarcoma growth factor (SGF), transforming growth factors (TGFs), and epidermal growth factor (EGF). In addition, there are growth factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), for which structural homologs have not been identified. See Insulin, Protein

The stimulation of cell proliferation by several growth factors is similar in some ways to the rapid cell proliferation characteristic of tumor cells. Furthermore, the growth factor receptors are similar to the tumor-causing proteins produced by several RNA tumor viruses. It has been demonstrated that platelet-derived growth factor is virtually identical to the tumor-causing protein of the RNA tumor virus, simian sarcoma virus. Some forms of cancer involve improper function of growth factors.

growth factor

[′grōth ‚fak·tər]
(aerospace engineering)
The additional weight of fuel and structural material required by the addition of 1 pound (0.45 kilogram) of payload to the original payload.
(physiology)
Any factor, genetic or extrinsic, which affects growth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nerve Growth Factor Shows Promising Potential Against Diabetes II-20
When given to women undergoing drug therapy for breast cancer, this growth factor led to modest increases in infection-fighting blood cells and in other types of blood cells, but it also stimulated allergic reactions, report Michael S.
Dexamethasone induces connective tissue growth factor expression in renal tubular epithelial cells in a mouse strain-specific manner.
The duo also wanted to see if a very short course of growth factor could spark more collateral blood flow.
Researchers had previously demonstrated that a peptide called basic fibroblast growth factor could trigger the beneficial growth of vessels supplying the heart with blood (SN: 1/29/94, p.
It blocks all VEGF-A isoforms plus placental growth factor (PIGF), another angiogenic growth factor that may play a role in tumor angiogenesis.
In the Growth Factor studies recently published by the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, patients with arm bruising were studied over the course of 6 weeks applying Growth Factors morning and night.
However, most stem cell researchers prefer to use growth factors of non-animal origin to exclude risks of viral contamination and the inclusion of growth factor homologs.
Insulin-like growth factor and growth hormone (a regulator of circulating insulin-like growth factor) control growth and differentiation.
Cell Rejuvenation Serum, manufactured by Topix, contains transforming growth factor (TGF) beta, a growth factor that increases collagen production.
Previous studies have linked psychosocial factors such as elevated depression levels to delayed oral wound healing, and a relationship between psychosocial factors and growth factor expression in saliva may explain this delay, reported Dr.
People who were more lonely and depressed exhibited significantly lower epidermal growth factor levels, compared with people who were not particularly lonely or depressed.

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