growth form

growth form

[′grōth ‚fȯrm]
(ecology)
The habit of a plant determined by its appearance of branching and periodicity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The three habitats represented by >5 communities in our dataset (terra firme, floodplains and swamps in lowland tropical evergreen forest) separate clearly in a PCA performed on the number of species in each growth form (excluding Medium/Small Palms with Stout Stems) (Fig.
Characterized in quickening the elimination of traditional free-ranging and rapid development of large scale farming, the entire industry accelerates the transition from extensive quantity growth form to intensive quality efficiency form and from hypernormal disorderly development to steady and orderly development.
Characterized in quickening the elimination of traditional free-range and the rapid development of large scale farming, the entire industry accelerates the transition from extensive quantity growth form to intensive quality efficiency form and from hypernormal disorderly development to steady and orderly development.
Once these variables are converted into growth form equation (3) can be written as:
All other Huperzia plants in the vicinity appeared normal, suggesting that this unusual growth form was the result of abnormal development rather than ecotypic variation.
Alan Kearsley-Evans, the National Trust's Coast and Countryside manager for Gower and Ceredigion, said: "Certain species of cotoneaster have an aggressive growth form and can do very well in exposed coastal positions.
When the nodes and roots permitting future growth form improperly, it is difficult to say what productive capacities those trees will have in the future.
In the first experiments, the team exposed the pathogen's threadlike growth form, called "mycelium," to various piperideine or piperidine concentrations and monitored the effect on the colony size of P.
Bredenkamp and Gregoire (1988) noted, in studying stands of the flooded gum Eucalyptus grandis, a non-asymptotic growth form in stands with heavy mortality; i.
The positive relationship between moose abundance (PELLET) and the density of post-budworm regeneration is likely a function of: 1) the significant correlation with the density of severely browsed saplings (Table 5), 2) growth form adaptations in response to browsing, and 3) rapid degradation of moose feces by insects and precipitation (as found by Timmerman and Buss 1997).
In-depth studies of the growth form and anatomy of wood cells produced unexpected results, indicating that flowering plants originated not as trees, as thought throughout most of the 20th century, but as relatively non-woody "pre-trees" that could outcompete ancient plants like conifers.