guarded

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guarded

Enclosed, fenced, covered, shielded, or otherwise protected, by means of suitable barriers, rails, screens, covers or casings, mats, or platforms, to prevent dangerous contact.
References in periodicals archive ?
I have suggested that this obligation is due to an underlying logic of community honor, according to which the demonstrable sexual restraint and guardedness of a woman serves as a positive marker of the manly strength, status, and prestige of the man who is her protector.
A similar guardedness can be traced in his analysis of the Sonata in B Minor (chapter 6), which Walker rightly observes "is clearly intriguing enough to bear many interpretations" (p.
After a number of weeks of this guardedness with me, and hearing more about his sense of rejection in several relationships, illumination struck.
We are convinced that openness and transparency in archdiocesan financial matters is far preferable to guardedness and secrecy and, in the long run, is more appropriate to who we are as church," wrote the priests.
I share Dana Levin's sense of the peculiar guardedness (nervously self-protective, evasive, beautiful in all its surfaces) to which her generation seems drawn--that that generation is extravagantly gifted only makes Levin's critique more urgent.
22) Their careful guardedness against the charge of sectarianism and segregation, understandable in Catholics inhabiting a Protestant country, made them uneasy allies of the rabidly nationalistic Henley, and united the medieval enthusiasm of Benjamin Disraeli and William Morris with the emergent 'Modernism' of liberal Catholic theology, which sought to reconcile traditional belief with the discoveries of history and science.
But Jaccottet's hesitancy before the figure of Christ and before the language of faith in general has little or nothing of the jealous guardedness of the poetic self that it does in Rilke.
The dominance of the African American prizefighter, the racial guardedness of the lovers, even the dialogue is unaffected.
It's self-protection as much as guardedness, say acquaintances, who note that the actress has been making movies since she was a teenager in Spain.
This evocation of the painter's formative years reverberates through the rest of Stevens's and Swan's account, helping to explain (but not justify) the often less than admirable aspects of his behavior decades later: his doubt, his indecisiveness, his sense of being an outsider, his guardedness, his womanizing, his depression, his drinking.
There is a certain amount of guardedness that fun can relieve between management and subordinates.