guilty


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Related to guilty: not guilty

guilty

1. Law having committed an offence or adjudged to have done so
2. plead guilty Law (of a person charged with an offence) to admit responsibility; confess
References in classic literature ?
Both North and South have been guilty before God; and the Christian church has a heavy account to answer.
Then I sped away in a guilty hurry, and even when I was a mile from the church I was still glancing back, every moment, to see if I was being pursued.
The truth was, all were guilty but Roxana; she suspected that the others were guilty, but she did not know them to be so.
Several witnesses deposed concerning Potter's guilty behavior when brought to the scene of the murder.
There was no jam there as a matter of fact, but the guilty Minnie's handkerchief went to her crimson face in a flash.
It was committed in the presence of slaves, and they of course could neither institute a suit, nor testify against him; and thus the guilty perpetrator of one of the bloodiest and most foul murders goes unwhipped of justice, and uncensured by the community in which he lives.
It was true that she had not to charge herself, in this instance as in the former, with being the sole and original author of the mischief; with having suggested such feelings as might otherwise never have entered Harriet's imagination; for Harriet had acknowledged her admiration and preference of Frank Churchill before she had ever given her a hint on the subject; but she felt completely guilty of having encouraged what she might have repressed.
I should hold myself guilty of greater impropriety in accepting a horse from my brother, than from Willoughby.
Charles Darnay had yesterday pleaded Not Guilty to an indictment denouncing him (with infinite jingle and jangle) for that he was a false traitor to our serene, illustrious, excellent, and so forth, prince, our Lord the King, by reason of his having, on divers occasions, and by divers means and ways, assisted Lewis, the French King, in his wars against our said serene, illustrious, excellent, and so forth; that was to say, by coming and going, between the dominions of our said serene, illustrious, excellent, and so forth, and those of the said French Lewis, and wickedly, falsely, traitorously, and otherwise evil-adverbiously, revealing to the said French Lewis what forces our said serene, illustrious, excellent, and so forth, had in preparation to send to Canada and North America.
But when it is a question of the life of a king it is better to sacrifice the innocent than save the guilty.
replied D'Artagnan; "but now, suppose this poor Comte de Wardes were less guilty than you think him?
Danglars is guilty, he shall cease to live, or I shall die.