guilty


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Related to guilty: not guilty

guilty

1. Law having committed an offence or adjudged to have done so
2. plead guilty Law (of a person charged with an offence) to admit responsibility; confess
References in classic literature ?
Among the captives were the guilty, downcast countenances of the counterfeiters, and the simple but honest features of the Leather-Stocking.
I may say not guilty, with a clean conscience,” returned Natty; “for there’s no guilt in doing what’s right; and I’d rather died on the spot, than had him put foot in the hut at that moment.
It is decreed of fate, and therefore I am not guilty in this respect.
And besides," continued Rosa, "the people want to find you guilty.
If he be guilty, he is as guilty in his own house as anywhere else.
Fouquet to flee; and the more guilty he may have been, the greater will the king's honor and glory appear, compared with such unnecessary misery and shame.
therefore let us forthwith bring him in guilty of death.
This creature you must hide in some safe place, and if the jury decides that Eureka is guilty you may then produce this piglet and claim it is the one that was lost.
A thousand times rather would I have confessed myself guilty of the crime ascribed to Justine, but I was absent when it was committed, and such a declaration would have been considered as the ravings of a madman and would not have exculpated her who suffered through me.
Very well," said the Magistrate, putting on the black cap and a solemn look; "as the accused makes no defence, and is undoubtedly guilty, I sentence her to be eaten by the public executioner; and as that position happens to be vacant, I appoint you to it, without bonds.
For men are not guilty of crimes for necessaries only (for which he thinks an equality of goods would be a sufficient remedy, as they would then have no occasion to steal cold or hunger), but that they may enjoy what the desire, and not wish for it in vain; for if their desire extend beyond the common necessaries of life, they were be wicked to gratify them; and not only so, but if their wishes point that way, they will do the same to enjoy those pleasures which are free from the alloy of pain.
It appears to be established, beyond any reasonable doubt, that he was killed (while he was asleep, or immediately on his waking) by being smothered with a pillow from his bed-- that the persons guilty of murdering him are the three Indians-- and that the object contemplated (and achieved) by the crime, was to obtain possession of the diamond, called the Moonstone.