guitarfish


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guitarfish:

see rayray,
extremely flat-bodied cartilaginous marine fish, related to the shark. The pectoral fins of most rays are developed into broad, flat, winglike appendages, attached all along the sides of the head; the animal swims by rippling movements of these wings.
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guitarfish

[gə′tär‚fish]
(vertebrate zoology)
The common name for fishes composing the family Rhinobatidae.
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References in periodicals archive ?
He pointed out that although guitarfish are not legally protected in Pakistan the fishing community considers them an important marine animal which should not be killed for mere extraction of liver oil and its fins.
fisheries and wildlife departments of Sindh and Balochistan to include guitarfish as a protected species.
WWF-Pakistan, the bowmouth guitarfish is vulnerable species according to IUCN Red list and its population has been seriously reduced in the area of its distribution.
Bowmouth guitarfish is known from the Persian Gulf, Red Sea and East Africa to Papua New Guinea, north to Japan, south to New South Wales and Australia.
Over the years, besides being weighed, total length (leopard sharks, brown/gray smoothhounds, shovelnose guitarfish, and thornbacks) or disk width (bat rays) for many individuals was also measured.
Bat rays, shovelnose guitarfish, and leopard sharks were the only species caught m numbers large enough to analyze for shifts in size class distributions, stage of maturity, sex ratios, and to generate length (TL or DW) weight regressions.
For leopard sharks and shovelnose guitarfish the differences between sizes at first maturity and 100% maturity are not as great.
The most obvious change has been the relative disappearance of shovelnose guitarfish from the catch.
Male and female shovelnose guitarfish exhibited more variability in their growth regressions than the other species.
Unlike bat rays and leopard sharks, the majority of shovelnose guitarfish caught were mature (average of 63% in the 1960's to 84% in the 1950's, with an overall average of 76%).
The sex ratios, grouped by decade and stage of maturity, showed that bat ray, leopard shark, and shovelnose guitarfish catches were generally dominated by females.
In fact, the relative abundance of bat rays in the catch has increased steadily over the decades, which indicates that while their numbers may have declined, they may be less susceptible to habitat alteration or fishing pressure than leopard sharks or shovelnose guitarfish.