Gulf

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Gulf.

For names of bodies of water beginning thus, see second part; e.g., for Gulf of Mexico, see Mexico, Gulf ofMexico, Gulf of,
arm of the Atlantic Ocean, c.700,000 sq mi (1,813,000 sq km), SE North America. The Gulf stretches more than 1,100 mi (1,770 km) from west to east and c.800 mi (1,290 km) from north to south.
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Gulf

 

bay, a part of an ocean, sea, or lake that extends inland but has a free exchange of water with the main body of water.

The hydrologic and hydrochemical conditions of a gulf (bay) are identical to the conditions of the body of water of which it is a part. In isolated cases local peculiarities of climate and continental flow can give to the hydrologic characteristics of the surface layer of a gulf (bay) some distinguishing features. Among the largest gulfs (bays) of the world’s oceans are the Gulf of Alaska, the Bay of Bengal, the Bay of Biscay, the Great Australian Bight, and the Gulf of Guinea. In a number of cases the name “gulf” (bay) has been attached to bodies of water that, by their hydrologic conditions, are seas (the Gulf of Mexico, Hudson Bay, the Persian Gulf, the Gulf of California).

International law of gulfs (bays). The waters of gulfs (bays), like the waters of ports and sounds, are internal waters of the littoral state, that is, they are subject to its exclusive jurisdiction if the width of the entrance to the gulf (bay) does not exceed the size specified by international law. At the Geneva Conference on Maritime Law in 1958 a resolution was accepted by virtue of which a gulf (bay) with an entrance no greater than 24 nautical miles in width should belong to internal waters, provided its shores belong to one state. If the shores belong to two or more states, the control of the waters is decided by the states by mutual agreement, with consideration for the rightful interests of other states. International practice also recognizes as internal waters several so-called historical gulfs (bays), independent of the width of the entrance into them, by virtue of particular historical, economic, or other conditions: for example, Peter the Great Bay in the USSR, Hudson Bay in Canada, and the Bay of Mont-Saint-Michel in France.

gulf

[gəlf]
(geography)
An abyss or chasm.
A large extension of the sea partially enclosed by land.

gulf

1. a large deep bay
2. a deep chasm

Gulf

the
1. the Persian Gulf
2. Austral
a. the Gulf of Carpentaria
b. of, relating to, or adjoining the Gulf
3. NZ the Hauraki Gulf
References in classic literature ?
The gulf yawned shiveringly wide at remarks like that; so, with the privilege of an elder, I declared it time for bed, and yawned off to my room.
These past, if any pass, the void profound Of unessential Night receives him next Wide gaping, and with utter loss of being Threatens him, plung'd in that abortive gulf.
the most eastern part of Africa) that the Gulf of Arabia begins, which at Babelmandel loses its name, and is called the Red Sea.
At this point indicated on the planisphere one of these currents was rolling, the Kuro-Scivo of the Japanese, the Black River, which, leaving the Gulf of Bengal, where it is warmed by the perpendicular rays of a tropical sun, crosses the Straits of Malacca along the coast of Asia, turns into the North Pacific to the Aleutian Islands, carrying with it trunks of camphor-trees and other indigenous productions, and edging the waves of the ocean with the pure indigo of its warm water.
And, all unsuspected, those missiles the Martians had fired at us drew earthward, rushing now at a pace of many miles a second through the empty gulf of space, hour by hour and day by day, nearer and nearer.
The usurper landed in France, near Antibes, in the Gulf of Juan, two hundred and fifty leagues from Paris, on the 1st of March, and you only acquired this information to-day, the
It was for the Mediterranean sailors that fair-haired sirens sang among the black rocks seething in white foam and mysterious voices spoke in the darkness above the moving wave - voices menacing, seductive, or prophetic, like that voice heard at the beginning of the Christian era by the master of an African vessel in the Gulf of Syrta, whose calm nights are full of strange murmurs and flitting shadows.
With this he conducted me to the verge of the cataract, and pointed along the side of the ravine to a number of curious looking roots, some three or four inches in thickness, and several feet long, which, after twisting among the fissures of the rock, shot perpendicularly from it and ran tapering to a point in the air, hanging over the gulf like so many dark icicles.
Death was in that poisonous wave, And in its gulf a fitting grave For him who thence could solace bring To his lone imagining -- Whose solitary soul could make An Eden of that dim lake.
I will," declared the Scarecrow, "for, if you found that you could not jump over the gulf, Dorothy would be killed, or the Tin Woodman badly dented on the rocks below.
from whom the people, changing their names, were called Italians instead of AEnotrians, and that part of Europe was called Italy which is bounded by the Scylletic Gulf on the one side and the Lametic on the other, the distance between which is about half a day's journey.
The canoe behaved much better under sail than I had hoped--infinitely better than the battle-ship Sari had--and we made good progress almost due west across the gulf, upon the opposite side of which I hoped to find the mouth of the river of which Juag had told me.