guncotton


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guncotton:

see nitrocellulosenitrocellulose,
nitric acid ester of cellulose (a glucose polymer). It is usually formed by the action of a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids on purified cotton or wood pulp.
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guncotton

[′gən‚kät·ən]
(materials)
Any of various nitrocellulose explosives of high nitration (13.35-13.4% nitrogen) made by treating cotton with nitric and sulfuric acids; used principally in the manufacture of single-base and double-base propellants.
References in periodicals archive ?
Long tunnels were driven down and forward in the chalk bedrock under the opponents' trenches and packed with ammonal or guncotton explosive; terrorist attacks in our own decade, when a ton or two of fertilizer-based mix is set off in a truck in London or Oklahoma City, show us the force of this mass of stuff.
Before 1951, 35-millimeter films for theatrical release were made of nitrocellulose, or nitrate, a chemical relative of guncotton, which is used in explosives.
To obtain unambiguous results, Bartknecht suggests the use of chemical ignitors (E = 10 KJ), 20 to 50 g of guncotton, and the flame of a welding torch.
As I mentioned in past columns, Scot's selling point is that their powders are made from nitrocotton, alias guncotton, rather than wood-derived nitrocellulose; for it is maintained that cotton is a more uniform product than wood and, consequently, cotton will therefore be more uniform as a propellant.