gyroscopic precession

gyroscopic precession

[‚jī·rə′skäp·ik prē′sesh·ən]
(mechanics)
The turning of the axis of spin of a gyroscope as a result of an external torque acting on the gyroscope; the axis always turns toward the direction of the torque.

gyroscopic precession

gyroscopic precession
A property of a gyroscope that causes it to react to an applied force as though it were applied at a point 90° in the direction of the rotation, from the actual point of application. This property is used in rate gyros to measure the rate of turn.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As the taildragger's tail is raised--and its nose/propeller lowered--during the takeoff roll, gyroscopic precession occurs.
However, gyroscopic precession affects them (and taildraggers) at other times, like when abruptly raising or lower the nose while airborne.
This phenomenon, called gyroscopic precession, is the same force that causes a boomerang to fly in a circular path.
Here we get into a situation of cascading forces where, for instance, the clockwise prop produces a left yaw (you know that from your first takeoff), but that yaw, in turn, through the gyroscopic precession of the left-spinning airframe itself causes a pitch up into a flatter spin.