habenula


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habenula

[hə′ben·yə·lə]
(anatomy)
Stalk of the pineal body.
A ribbonlike structure.
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The take-home of this study is that inhibition in this pathway is coming from an unusual co-release of neurotransmitters into the habenula," Shabel said.
Our study suggests that one of the ways in which serotonin alleviates depression is by rebalancing the brain's processing of negative life events vis--vis the balance of glutamate and GABA in the habenula," Shabel said.
The research has shown that the habenula got activated in response to pictures associated with painful electric shocks, with the opposite occurring for pictures that predicted winning money.
Senior author, Dr Jonathan Roiser of the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, said that the habenula didn't just express whether something led to negative events or not, it signaled quite how much bad outcomes were expected.
The habenula and brainstem are important in mediating stress/anxiety and eating habits respectively.
There's lots of new research showing that an overactive habenula has behavioral effects," says neuropharmacologist Martine Mirrione of Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, N.
To most people, who have never heard of the habenula, free will's existence seems obvious, because they can make up their own mind whether to believe in it or not.
and colleagues, tipped the balance that reigns in addictive behaviors by inactivating in rats a brain region called the lateral habenula.
By this functional organization the habenula acts as a kind of switch board, selecting certain sensory information and sending it to the downstream brainstem areas.
Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, and the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine provides evidence that inhibition of this particular brain region - the lateral habenula - using implanted electrodes can reverse certain behaviors associated with depression, and also provides a mechanism to explain this effect.
The team of scientists, led by Suresh Jesuthasan from the Agency of Science, Technology and Research/Duke-NUS Neuroscience Research Partnership, showed that disrupting a specific set of neurons in the habenula prevents normal response to stressful situations.
Washington, January 9 (ANI): Experts have been successfully able to treat a patient suffering from severe depression by stimulating the habenula, a tiny nerve structure in the brain.