habituation


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habituation

[hə‚bich·ə′wā·shən]
(medicine)
A condition of tolerance to the effects of a drug or a poison, acquired by its continued use; marked by a psychic craving for it when the drug is withdrawn.
Mild drug addiction in which withdrawal symptoms are not severe.
References in periodicals archive ?
In biographical essays from the 1830s and '40s, and in the enlarged 1856 Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, De Quincey manufactures the "record" of Coleridge's destructive opium habituation through suggestive allusion to literary figures who themselves struggle with of represent cultural anxieties about habituation.
This may have contributed to rapid habituation of neophobia during this single bout of exposure.
To produce rapid habituation, an inter-stimulus interval (ISI) of 15 s was employed.
Only the Venham score of the dentists during the habituation session in the young group differed significantly.
Like presentiment, precognitive affective habituation refers to the time-reversed influence of the stimuli before they are exposed, and, like presentiment, the effect has been found to be linked more specifically to negative than to positive stimuli.
It is not adaptive for habituation to occur without the mechanism for dishabituation (Krasne and Glanzman, 1995).
Getting used to a stimulus and showing no reaction after repetition is called habituation.
However, treated rats did not present any improvement of memory retention in open field habituation.
Cell variety, stage of ripeness and level of habituation to an acidic environment have little affect on their survival and growth.
Habituation to pain and subsequent acquired ability secondary to combat exposure, coupled with a post-deployment sense of failed/thwarted belongingness and/or burdensomeness would, according to Joiner's theory, place veterans at increased risk for suicidal behavior.
Future studies should focus on evaluating whether a prolonged period of cueing training increases the sizes of the effects found, to determine whether habituation occurs to the stimulus of the cue and to evaluate the falls risk over longer periods.