hackberry


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hackberry:

see elmelm,
common name for the Ulmaceae, a family of trees and shrubs chiefly of the Northern Hemisphere. Elm trees (genus Ulmus) have a limited use as hardwoods for timber, especially the rock or cork elm (U. thomasi).
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hackberry

hackberry

One of the oldest foraged foods, going back half a million years. Tiny berries 1/4 inch (.63cm) on tree from fall to spring. Orange-red when ripe. Berries are thin skin around large, hard seed. Seed is also edible. Skin can be sucked off, but best way to consume is to crush entire berries in mortar and pestle into a sweet delicious nutritious mush. This paste can be eaten raw or dried into a “food bar”. Seeds can be blended and strained into a milk just like almond milk. Tree bark is lumpy with wart-like growths all over it. Indians used hackberry for sore throats, colds and menstrual regulation.

Hackberry

 

(Celtis), a genus of deciduous or more rarely evergreen trees of the family Ulmaceae. The leaves are asymmetrical and serrated, with three veins at the base. The blossoms are opaque and polygamous, with a simple five-membered perianth. The fruit is a drupe. There are about 50 species in tropical and arid regions of the temperate zones in the western and eastern hemispheres. In the USSR there are two species. Caucasian hackberry (C. caucasicd) is a tree up to 20 m tall with grayish green downy leaves that grows in the Caucasus and Middle Asia. Smooth hackberry (C. glabratd) is 4– m tall and grows on dry rocky slopes of the Crimea and Caucasus.

Hackberry is widely used for greenery and for protective for-estation, especially in arid regions. The fruit is edible; the leavesare used for animal fodder and the bark in tanning hides. Thewood is hard and durable; it is used in cabinetry, woodworking, and carving.

I. A. GRUDZINSKAIA

hackberry

[′hak‚ber·ē]
(botany)
Celtis occidentalis. A tree of the eastern United States characterized by corky or warty bark, and by alternate, long-pointed serrate leaves unequal at the base; produces small, sweet, edible drupaceous fruit.
Any of several other trees of the genus Celtis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hackberry is also worth attention in other seasons.
John Sterling, a Milmont, PA-based furniture designer and woodworker, has used hackberry in his business, J.
Still, the marshes in southwest Louisiana, such as where we hunted at Hackberry, are more protected in some areas by the coastal highway that sits atop a sturdy levee.
observed these birds foraging predominantly in hackberry and gleaning (picking) prey from leaf and flower buds.
Northern pike were obtained from Hackberry Lake, a Nebraska Sandhill lake located in Cherry County in north-central Nebraska.
Data for both years indicated beavers preferred eastern cottonwood, white mulberry, Mexican buckeye, black willow, and bur oak on all rivers (Table 2) and avoided Chinaberry, hackberry, pecan, cedar elm, and boxelder on all rivers (Table 3).
There was nothing on the pasture but an old well that wasn't working, three fenced sides, two entry gates, two hackberry trees, a few thorny locust trees, and an old sturdy cow pen/chute.
The Cajun/country-western swing band the Hackberry Ramblers are the subject of "Make 'em Dance," a film airing on Oregon Public Broadcasting's KEPB at 11 p.
Twenty and twenty-five years after the tornado the most damaged portion of the forest is still a sugar maple/ slippery elm community, with chinkapin oak, Ohio buckeye, American basswood, white ash and hackberry of secondary importance.
Consider planting one of these drought to lerant trees: American plum (Prunus americana), bristlecone pine, burr oak (Quercus macrocarpa), cockspur thorn (Crataegus crus-galli), curl-leaf mountain mahogany (Cercocarpus ledifolius), Gambell oak, common hackberry (Celtis occidentalis), pinon pine, ponderosa pine (Montana's state tree), and upright junipers.
ages six and under) Crab Apple Black Cherry Red Oak Ginkgo White Oak Paper Birch Catalpa Redbud Weeping Willow Dogwood Hawthorn Sweet Gum Stag Horn Sumac Grey Birch Red Horse Chestnut Sugar Maple Green Ash (ages seven to twelve add these) Hemlock Box Elder Cottonwood Red Mulberry Chestnut Oak Serbian Spruce Purple Ash Slippery Elm Persimmon Juniper Silver Maple Japanese Maple Hickory Yellowwood Pecan Red Maple Hackberry Honeylocust