hack

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hack

1
1. a dry spasmodic cough
2. a kick on the shins, as in rugby

hack

2
1. a horse kept for riding or (more rarely) for driving
2. an old, ill-bred, or overworked horse
3. a horse kept for hire
4. Brit a country ride on horseback
5. US a coach or carriage that is for hire
6. US informal
a. a cab driver
b. a taxi

hack

a board on which meat is placed for a hawk

hack

(jargon)
1. Originally, a quick job that produces what is needed, but not well.

2. An incredibly good, and perhaps very time-consuming, piece of work that produces exactly what is needed.

3. To bear emotionally or physically. "I can't hack this heat!"

4. To work on something (typically a program). In an immediate sense: "What are you doing?" "I'm hacking TECO." In a general (time-extended) sense: "What do you do around here?" "I hack TECO." More generally, "I hack "foo"" is roughly equivalent to ""foo" is my major interest (or project)". "I hack solid-state physics." See Hacking X for Y.

5. To pull a prank on. See hacker.

6. To interact with a computer in a playful and exploratory rather than goal-directed way. "Whatcha up to?" "Oh, just hacking."

7. Short for hacker.

8. See nethack.

9. (MIT) To explore the basements, roof ledges, and steam tunnels of a large, institutional building, to the dismay of Physical Plant workers and (since this is usually performed at educational institutions) the Campus Police. This activity has been found to be eerily similar to playing adventure games such as Dungeons and Dragons and Zork. See also vadding.

See also neat hack, real hack.

hack

As a noun, a hack is the source code of a program. For example, the phrase "it must be done through a hack" means someone has to write programming code to solve the problem because there is no pre-written software that does the job.

As a verb, hack refers to writing a small program or adding code to an existing program to solve a problem in a hurry. A hack used to imply a low-level programming language, even deploying a fix in machine language (see patch). However, the term evolved, and today it can refer to code in any computer language. See machine language.

You're Not Supposed To!
A hack may refer to an enhancement made to an electronic device that was not designed to be user programmable, such as a video game, music player, TV set-top box or cellphone. For example, a digital media hub (media extender) could be modified to play additional formats.

This level of modification is done by the serious hacker, who first has to find a way to expose the software. It may require opening the case and using tools such as a screwdriver, wire strippers and soldering iron. For example, to make the first AT&T iPhones work in another network, an early hack required applying voltage to a line on its circuit board. It meant scraping the surface of a single wire trace without breaking the line and soldering a wire to it; a very delicate operation. Subsequent methods used to unlock iPhones were less extreme.

"Hacked" Means a Harmful Hack
"Getting hacked" has another connotation. Although the original meaning of hack is program code that was modified, the popular definition is an illegal modification that causes a computer or online account to be compromised. See attack, hacker and hackathon.



Geek Humor
From "The Best of The Joy of Tech" cartoon book by Nitrozac and Snaggy (O'Reilly Media, Inc., 2003, ISBN 0-596-00578-4). (Image courtesy of GeekCulture, www.geekculture.com)







Hacks Galore
The term is often used to refer to any tip or technique for improving performance or configuring hardware or software; witness these titles from O'Reilly Media, Inc.







Hack Everything!
"The Big Book of Hacks" offers imaginative hacks from turning an old netbook into a tablet to boosting Wi-Fi with a vegetable steamer. Also included are how to make fridge magnets from a hard drive and a dipole antenna from a closet hanger. See life hack.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a global movement designed to connect individuals from a variety of disciplines and backgrounds, Science Hack Day has held over 30 events in a dozen countries since its launch in 2010.
After reading over 200 websites and finding the best and most useful life hacks, iwantcheats tested the findings rigorously to make sure they actually held up to the promised standards.
Unlike other open-world games--like "GTA V," the game that "Watch Dogs" has been most compared to--money is not such a big issue to hack and obtain.
The second edition offers both new and thoroughly updated hacks for Linux, Windows, OpenBSD, and Mac OS X servers that not only enable readers to secure TCP/IP-based services, but helps them implement a good deal of clever host-based security techniques as well.
The Hacks were delighted when their eldest son hooked up with Kate and were thrilled when she fell pregnant four years ago.
The 120 hacks in the book range in complexity from beginner to expert, but even the expert hacks provide enough information for a daring user to try.
Hacks think that if being smart makes someone a wonk, they'd rather be stupid.
He is a computer user, but not a programmer, who hacks with software written by others.
This wave of hacks prove that there are a lot of loaded, unsecured guns out there on the Internet.
Cooking Hacks by Libelium Helps Makers Develop Products to Monitor Medical Data
We're excited to support the inaugural Science Hack Day in Russia, and look forward to the creative hacks that emerge from St.
com/bank-america-hacked-anonymous-hackers-leak-secrets-about-executives-salaries-spy-activities-1107947) increase in cybercriminal activity over the past several years 6 including hacks and phishing schemes that have become more effective at silently stealing sensitive information, usually for financial gain 6 most users are completely oblivious to the dangers of the Internet, and how to prevent one's computer from being hacked.