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must

Winemaking the newly pressed juice of grapes or other fruit ready for fermentation
References in classic literature ?
Sophia was much pleased with the beauty of the girl, whom she pitied for her simplicity in having dressed herself in that manner, as she saw the envy which it had occasioned among her equals.
They had not been gone a week, when two Indians arrived of the Pallatapalla tribe, who live upon a river of the same name.
It is singular enough that I had intended to volunteer a full explanation this very day; so, if you will give me another glass of wine, I will satisfy your curiosity.
When I came to England I was as perfect a stranger to all the world as if I had never been known there.
And to this hour I have not the faintest notion what he meant, or what joke he thought I had made.
He had inhabited the same house ever since his childhood, for it was the house in which his father and grandfather, old established princely merchants of the princely city of Dort, were born.
The Postilions had at first received orders only to take the London road; as soon as we had sufficiently reflected However, we ordered them to Drive to M .
I lived here about a year, and completed my studies in divinity; in which time some letters were received from the fathers in Aethiopia, with an account that Sultan Segued, Emperor of Abyssinia, was converted to the Church of Rome, that many of his subjects had followed his example, and that there was a great want of missionaries to improve these prosperous beginnings.
Connoisseurs of such matters declared that rarely had so many beautiful women been assembled in one place.
Reflecting on this case, it occurred to me that if the Melipona had made its spheres at some given distance from each other, and had made them of equal sizes and had arranged them symmetrically in a double layer, the resulting structure would probably have been as perfect as the comb of the hive-bee.
The general reasons for the first have been discussed; it remains to name those for the second, and to see what resources he had, and what any one in his situation would have had for maintaining himself more securely in his acquisition than did the King of France.
He informed me that the Indians had certainly been passengers on board his vessel--but as far as Gravesend only.