hagiography

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hagiography

1. the writing of the lives of the saints
2. biography of the saints
3. any biography that idealizes or idolizes its subject
References in periodicals archive ?
It is also, even though again not surprising in the hagiographical genre, a very clear reminder that the female body can be used by a divine or devilish agency for disruptive and defiant purposes.
Without entirely discounting the possibility of the miraculous, as she need not nor indeed cannot do, Cooper-Rompato seeks alternative ways of understanding unexpected female literacy, whether as hagiographical rhetoric or invented explanation.
30) This is another common hagiographical element: the saint's ability to know, have premonition of his/her death.
The multiplicity of meaning that likely arose when a hagiographical text was read for personal devotion or within a textual community unmediated by representatives of officialdom, in this case the medieval church hierarchy, no doubt did create a space for the development of different, sometimes heretical beliefs.
Although commemorative in nature the book is not in any sense a mere hagiographical interpretation of Derrida's philosophical worth, but is presented as an ongoing dialogue with and even critique of the master's own private and public philosophical reveries and revelations.
Since that time, the stories of persecution have been relegated to academic textbooks and the hagiographical efforts of Baptist successionists.
We have now learned that Renaissance humanists produced a significant hagiographical literature.
In addition, she sometimes uses Franciscan hagiographical texts too uncritically as historical narratives.
For sheer unctuousness and cringe-making hagiographical bombast, there may be no equal.
The second focuses more specifically on the hagiographical narratives surrounding the "People of the House," that is, the family of 'Ali and the Imams of Twelver Shi'a tradition.
These programmes generally lurch between the hagiographical and the 'real-life' expose, but in each case the individual stands dominant but isolated; at times, wholly removed from his social context.
5) Those of his lifetime, or soon thereafter, were hagiographical.