hagiography

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hagiography

1. the writing of the lives of the saints
2. biography of the saints
3. any biography that idealizes or idolizes its subject
References in periodicals archive ?
If the hagiographies are recorded by males, how does this influence the telling of the stories and how does it place the animals in the context of female saints?
With those two minor critiques aside, this is a well-done study of the role of hagiographies in the Middle Ages.
Regarding spells, Kieschnick believes it possible to use the hagiographies to trace a process of gradual sinicization in their use over several centuries (84-90).
The third chapter, titled "Scholarship," should be read closely by those who focus on scholastic Buddhism in China, because it consists of rich gleanings from the hagiographies about what the course of study of learned monks consisted of, what the life of learning in Buddhist monastic contexts was like, the role of debate and commentary, and the estimation of scholarship relative to other types of monastic activity.
The sense of expansion into unknown territories, of taming the wilderness, within the hagiographies is seen to be one largely of convention and promotion of a particular saint.
Chapter 5 considers the hagiographies in relation to the monastic cultures within which they were produced, and compares the vitae of saints written at different locations, considering the relation of those religious houses with the cult of the saint.
The Old English poetic hagiographies, then, lift the devil and his dealings with the saint out of human history and into the spiritual cosmos; the devil "inhabits the timeless, boundless space of mythological symbols" to participate in "the ontological battle between heaven and hell that is simultaneously fought in all places and in all times, through the pawns of demons and saints" (81).
Here she is joined by eighteen other women, differing widely in marital and social status, and in useful evidence of their lives, whose hagiographies are perceived as the outcome of a collaboration between their male authors and their female subjects.
A recovered academic of religion, Canadian Harding assembles curiosities of Christian lore and legend primarily from scholarly references, including concordances, histories, hagiographies, and biographical and historical dictionaries.
Burrus brings together history, theology, critical theory, philosophy, and autobiography in a dazzling series of readings of early Christian hagiographies that will, by turns, delight, confound, illuminate, and challenge diverse historians, theologians, and theorists.
Much of what is known about beatas comes either from hagiographies of the founding mothers of beaterios or from trial records of those who ran afoul of the Inquisition.
In the second, he provides a historical analysis of the formation of the hagiographies, exploring such factors as authorship and authority, the geography of the authors, the evolution of the hagiographies, and the translation of a biography written around 781.