hagiography


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hagiography

1. the writing of the lives of the saints
2. biography of the saints
3. any biography that idealizes or idolizes its subject
References in periodicals archive ?
Collins ends by casting a brief glance at the hagiography of the post-Reformation period, highlighting in particular its polemical functions and the philological precision and documentary thoroughness that characterized the Bollandist enterprise.
In spite of this, however, the book suffers in its lack of historiographical context for its discussion of hagiography in different eras.
The result identifies the novel with the folk tale, a genre at the heart of hagiography: "The difference between fairy tale and hagiography is between the suspension of disbelief on the one hand and the imposition of belief on the other" (121).
In five elegant case studies, Frazier demonstrates the scale and scope of humanist hagiography and explores its varied connections with both cultural traditions and current politics.
It is a work of homage, or hagiography, by the doyenne of French feminists, Helene Cixous.
He's a Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer from whom serious readers were expecting something more than Will & Grace meets Harold and Maude--a tasteful Hollywood hagiography, replete with remembrances of Parcheesi games past and such culinary directives as "Don't forget to slice the grapes.
Unfortunately this glitzy release from the eminent Boston Pops Orchestra, self-regarding of its own image for all the breathless hagiography of the insert-note, comes as a massive let-down.
Hagiography has become an increasingly popular field both for historians and for literary scholars, and feminist academics have contributed several fine studies of women saints, concentrating in particular on virgin martyrs.
Keeper of the Faith may be regarded more as hagiography than a dispassionate biography.
199-212, 334-39, 380), manifest more the characteristics of hagiography than those of contemporary history.
Such works, intended largely for popular edification, compose the genre namthar, "perfect enlightenment"--where, understandably, the boundaries between "biography' "autobiography," and hagiography are fluid indeed.
According to the breathless narrative of this tasteless hagiography, a glorified exhibition catalogue, the house built by Venturi for his mother and himself is 'the most significant house of the second half of the twentieth century'.