half-hardy plant

half-hardy plant

[¦haf ‚här·dē ′plant]
(botany)
A plant that can withstand relatively low temperatures but cannot survive severe freezing in cold climates unless carefully protected.
References in periodicals archive ?
A IT flowers round the stem and is an attractive half-hardy plant best suited to a houseplant on a sunny windowsill.
Half-hardy plants can bring an exotic air to urban plots - morning glories, for example, engulfing a trellis in a season.
The book goes by the grand title of Popular Garden Botany: Containing a Familiar and Scientific Description of Most of the Hardy and Half-Hardy Plants Introduced into the Flower Garden.
Move any half-hardy plants from the greenhouse into a cold frame for hardening of f.
Above all, avoid buying tender or half-hardy plants unless you can protect them against the cold that's bound to show its face before summer really arrives.
If you haven't done so already spread a 3- to 4-inch layer of organic mulch around half-hardy plants, over bulb beds, and under trees and shrubs.
The truth is that many of these half-hardy plants need more than just protection from frost - they need extra warmth, upwards of 15[degrees]C (59[degrees]F), until at least the middle of May and should not be put out in their permanent positions in the garden until the end of May.
Tender perennials - or half-hardy plants - are the floral highlight of all the plants I grow.
These are half-hardy plants, particularly suitable for sunny, exotic gardens or a planting scheme based on `hot' colours.
Having got rid of all those summer bedding plants, lifted your half-hardy plants and prepared other subjects to bring indoors at the first hint of a frost, you can clear areas in the garden, ready to re-develop them.
If you haven't done so already, spread a 3- to 4-inch layer of organic mulch around half-hardy plants, on bulb beds, and under trees and shrubs.