half-hardy plant

half-hardy plant

[¦haf ‚här·dē ′plant]
(botany)
A plant that can withstand relatively low temperatures but cannot survive severe freezing in cold climates unless carefully protected.
References in periodicals archive ?
A IT flowers round the stem and is an attractive half-hardy plant best suited to a houseplant on a sunny windowsill.
The truth is that many of these half-hardy plants need more than just protection from frost - they need extra warmth, upwards of 15[degrees]C (59[degrees]F), until at least the middle of May and should not be put out in their permanent positions in the garden until the end of May.
Tender perennials - or half-hardy plants - are the floral highlight of all the plants I grow.
These are half-hardy plants, particularly suitable for sunny, exotic gardens or a planting scheme based on `hot' colours.
Move any half-hardy plants from the greenhouse into a cold frame for hardening of f.
Above all, avoid buying tender or half-hardy plants unless you can protect them against the cold that's bound to show its face before summer really arrives.
If you haven't done so already spread a 3- to 4-inch layer of organic mulch around half-hardy plants, over bulb beds, and under trees and shrubs.
But for the half-hardy plants which are either condemned to a chilly demise or set for a winter of relative luxury in a greenhouse, you can feed up to the death, so to speak.
Plant breeders worked hard to develop suitable half-hardy plants with bright, often garish colours that were then used in large, sweeping flower beds and ornate gardens that the public could enjoy.
Having got rid of all those summer bedding plants, lifted your half-hardy plants and prepared other subjects to bring indoors at the first hint of a frost, you can clear areas in the garden, ready to re-develop them.
If you haven't done so already, spread a 3- to 4-inch layer of organic mulch around half-hardy plants, on bulb beds, and under trees and shrubs.