hallucinogenic


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hallucinogenic

[hə‚lüs·ən·ə′jen·ik]
(pharmacology)
Of or pertaining to a hallucinogen.
(psychology)
Referring to any stimulus that creates the impression of experiencing a hallucination.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arthur Cave, 15, fell to his death from a cliff near Brighton in July after consuming hallucinogenic drug LSD.
These included the Peruvian Torch cactus, a variety which produces the Class A drug mescaline, and illegal hallucinogenic mushrooms, as well as "high productivity" cannabis seeds.
It then documents the availability for use of indole hallucinogenic plants, which cross-cultural studies have shown to have powerful psychological and religious impact on those individuals who have been socialized in their use.
Alaska Senator Gene Therriault has called the plant a "very powerful hallucinogenic substance" capable of "long-lasting psychological effects.
Australian author Ranulfo delivers a fast, furious, hallucinogenic version of Hamlet, set in the "little Aussie town" of Elsinore and featuring 17-year-old Matt.
I thought he smoked dope occasionally but didn't think he took hallucinogenic drugs.
When viewed from below it becomes a pink and green hallucinogenic vortex, but is also, more prosaically, a vertical street on which students and staff can linger to chat.
In November the Supreme Court heard arguments from American members of a Brazilian religious sect, O Centro Espirita Beneficiente Uniao do Vegetal--loosely translated as Union of the Vegetable--to allow them to continue to use a hallucinogenic tea in religious ceremonies.
Replete with a hallucinogenic landscape, it included morphing objects, a faceless man, and--above all--lots and lots of enormous, blinking, staring eyes.
A small Brazil-based religious group that uses a mildly hallucinogenic tea during its ceremonies has sparked a battle over the limits of religious freedom that reached the Supreme Court Nov.
It was about that time that Puerto Vallarta's first informal art galleries opened to showcase local talent--later including the vivaciously colorful work of Mexico's Huichol Indians, known for their peyote-fueled hallucinogenic rituals.
We do not know if these murals represent early social interactions (the hunt, sacred rites, tribal ceremonies); hallucinogenic imagination inflamed by fumes in unventilated caves; unknown primitive rituals; or simply artistic compulsion.