handle


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handle

1. the quality, as of textiles, perceived by touching or feeling
2. Gambling the total amount of a bet on a horse race or similar event

handle

[′han·dəl]
(computer science)
One of several small squares that appear around a selected object in an object-oriented computer-graphics program, and can be dragged with a mouse to move, enlarge, reduce, or change the shape of the object.
In particular, one of the two interior points on a Bézier curve that can be dragged to alter its shape. Also known as control handle.
(mechanical engineering)
The arm connecting the bucket with the boom in a dipper shovel or hoe.

handle

(programming, operating system)
A simple item of data that identifies a resource. For example, a Unix file handle identifies an open file and associated data such as whether it was opened for read or write and the current read/write position. On the Macintosh, a handle is a pointer to a pointer to some dynamically-allocated memory. The extra level of indirection allows on-the-fly memory compaction or garbage collection without invalidating application program references to the allocated memory.

handle

(jargon)
An alias used intended to conceal a user's true identity in an electronic message. The term is common on Citizen's Band and other amateur radio but, in that context usually means the user's real name as FCC rules forbid concealing one's identity.

Use of grandiose handles is characteristic of crackers, weenies, spods, and other lower forms of network life; true hackers travel on their own reputations.

Compare nick.

handle

(1) Slang for a nickname, pseudonym, alias or username. For example, a Twitter handle is how people identify themselves on Twitter. For decades, "CB handles" have been the short but unique identities truck drivers use over citizens' band radio (see CB radio).

(2) A temporary name or number assigned to a file, font or other object. For example, an operating system may assign a sequential number to each file that it opens as a way of identifying it.

(3) In computer graphics, a tiny, square block on an image that can be grabbed for reshaping.


Graphics Handles
The handles are the tiny (blue) squares that are displayed when you select an object.
References in classic literature ?
Wilson examined the finger marks on the knife handle and said to himself, "Neither of the twins made those marks.
It had been his companion for twelve years, always standing on the same spot, always lending its handle to him in the early morning, so that its form had an expression for him of willing helpfulness, and the impress of its handle on his palm gave a satisfaction mingled with that of having the fresh clear water.
When the remedy that is in the handle of the club is warmed by your hand it will penetrate throughout your body.
After several blows he perceived that the stones were not cemented, but had been merely placed one upon the other, and covered with stucco; he inserted the point of his pickaxe, and using the handle as a lever, with joy soon saw the stone turn as if on hinges, and fall at his feet.
She went upstairs and got the store-room key, which was made of bronze and had a handle of ivory; she then went with her maidens into the store-room at the end of the house, where her husband's treasures of gold, bronze, and wrought iron were kept, and where was also his bow, and the quiver full of deadly arrows that had been given him by a friend whom he had met in Lacedaemon--Iphitus the son of Eurytus.
The general who thoroughly understands the advantages that accompany variation of tactics knows how to handle his troops.
Let us show these poor heathen that we can handle our weapons like men of might.
A schooner, yawl, or cutter in charge of a capable man seems to handle herself as if endowed with the power of reasoning and the gift of swift execution.
But leaving these curiosities (though not unworthy to be thought on, in fit place), we will handle, what persons are apt to envy others; what persons are most subject to be envied themselves; and what is the difference between public and private envy.
His axe was near him, but the blade was rusted and the handle broken off short.
This conception is the one handle by means of which the material of history, as at present expounded, can be dealt with, and anyone who breaks that handle off, as Buckle did, without finding some other method of treating historical material, merely deprives himself of the one possible way of dealing with it.
While the others were building they learned to handle theirs.