hard labour


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hard labour

Criminal law (formerly) the penalty of compulsory physical labour imposed in addition to a sentence of imprisonment: abolished in England in 1948
References in periodicals archive ?
The book states: "Gething was recommitted to Dartmoor, where the daily ration for those undertaking hard labour - usually 22oz of bread and two pints of porridge - was respectively halved and quartered.
James Dick, done for unlawful wounding in |December 1904, given six months of hard labour
John Bolton, 26, was convicted of stealing leather and received six months' hard labour, while Patrick O'Neil, 19, got 18 months' hard labour for housebreaking.
Back then prisoners were subject to hard labour and isolation and the alternative was the death penalty or transportation.
The Raml Misdemeanour Court sentenced 41 defendants to seven years of hard labour and seven years of probation following their release; they were arrested during clashes which took place on 6 October.
Bae's sister said that he was back to eight-hours-a-day, six-days-a-week hard labour.
Journalists Laura Ling and Euna Lee were sentenced to 12 years' hard labour in 2009 after illegally crossing the border from China while making a documentary about defectors.
Roger, chairman of Norton Canes Historical Society, said: "There was one 13-year-old from Somerset who was sentenced to 14 days' hard labour for stealing a waistcoat, followed by two years at the school.
Our minors are doing hard labour, in addition to being insulted and beaten.
These were just some of the offenders kept at the Newcastle Gaol and House of Correction before they were sentenced to hard labour for their crimes.
Despite their tender years, they received prison sentences and hard labour for the most petty crimes.
Criminals include Samuel Baker, 73, sentenced to nine months' hard labour after breaking into a house to steal two brushes, some vests, and a pair of stockings in 1893; Charles Wood, an unemployed drunk sentenced to one month in prison for "refusing to quit the beer-house" in 1872; and 18-year-old George Pill, who stole a donkey from a neighbour in 1894, resulting in six weeks' hard labour.