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hard

1. Chem (of water) impairing the formation of a lather by soap
2. (of alcoholic drink) being a spirit rather than a wine, beer, etc.
3. (of a drug such as heroin, morphine, or cocaine) highly addictive
4. Physics (of radiation, such as gamma rays and X-rays) having high energy and the ability to penetrate solids
5. Physics (of a vacuum) almost complete
6. Chiefly US (of goods) durable
7. politically extreme
8. Brit a roadway across a foreshore

hard

[härd]
(materials)
Quality of a material that is compact, solid, and difficult to deform.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jamshaid has a pot full of hard-boiled eggs that he keeps peeled and ready to serve.
All you need is: hard-boiled or blown eggs, yellow food coloring, and a sharpie.
Critique: A superbly crafted mystery from first page to last, this is a cliff-hanger of a read that will please any and all hard-boiled private eye enthusiasts.
Critique: The late Elisabeth Sanxay Holding (1889-1955) was an American novelist and short story writer who primarily wrote detective novels in the hard-boiled school of detective fiction.
4 Place the quark and fish mixture in a large mixing bowl with the hard-boiled eggs, prawns and lemon juice, season and mix well.
EGG MAYO SANDWICH SP Mash hard-boiled egg and mix with 1 level tbsp extra-light mayonnaise.
Top 4 of the prepared pieces of bread with 1/4 each of the chicken, avocado, bacon, hard-boiled eggs and lettuce.
From Good Friday to Easter Sunday the airline will be offering Business Class travellers on its European flights coloured hard-boiled eggs and inviting them to play EiertE-tschen (egg-tapping) with their neighbour.
All you need for this decorating technique are hard-boiled eggs, a bowl, boiling water, color and vinegar.
Chronological chapters analyze Edgar Allan Poe's Dupin tales, female sleuths and dangerous women, the imperial origins of hard-boiled fiction, and US overseas expansion and Jim Crow in early African American detective writing.
The act of singing undermines conventional understandings of maleness in its dominant American form: to burst into song is to contradict the ethos of the strong and silent man, a figure epitomized by such figures as the cowboy, the gangster, or the hard-boiled detective.
Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe: The Hard-Boiled Detective Transformed.