hardenability


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hardenability

[‚härd·ən·ə′bil·əd·ē]
(metallurgy)
In a ferrous alloy, the property that determines the depth and distribution of hardness induced by quenching from elevated temperatures.
References in periodicals archive ?
alloys),Jominey hardenability test machine ,Induction heating furnace,Rolling Mill Model
Steel gives strength, durability, corrosion resistance, hardenability, formability, weldability, and ductility to the products made by end-user industries.
3% of total weight) in aluminum alloys containing copper and silicon significantly increased the material work hardenability and drastically reduced the tendency toward built-up edge formation on the cutting tool.
Mechanical Testing - Hardness, Tensile and Proof Load, Jominy Hardenability, Expansion (Pin test), Flattening, Conductivity, Flare, Fastener, Bend, Stress Rupture, Hydrogen Embrittlement, Impact (Charpy), Drop Weight, Metallographic Evaluation, Weld and Braze Evaluation, and Failure Analysis.
Here, with occasional help from colleagues, he examines the use of intensive water quenching to achieve the desired mechanical properties in steel parts made with steel alloys of lower hardenability, which are presumably less expensive.
This system of loading and unloading indentation reading and memorizing pairs of values force/indentation depth gives the possibility to determine not only the universal hardness, but also some important indices of the material (elastic modulus, strain hardenability, tendency to creep, plastic deformation work etc.
Beta alloys in contrast have high strength, good formability and hardenability.
They are arranged in sections on heat transfer, modeling and simulation, distortion and residual stresses, property predictions, quenchants and quenching, gas quenching, hardenability, cooling curve analysis methodologies, and dilatometric analysis, modeling quenching and tempering induced phase transformations in steels, predicting quench-hardness within the whole volume of axially symmetric workpieces of any shape, the gas-cooling of multiple short inline disks in flow along their axis, and the dilatometric analysis of aging in aluminum alloys.
Molybdenum is mostly used in the production of alloys and stainless steels, it enhances strength, hardenability, corrosion resistance, and importantly weldability.
In the weld, this requirement can drive the need to utilize a welding consumable that delivers the requisite performance reliably, but at the expense of increased hardenability.