harlequinade


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harlequinade

Theatre a play or part of a pantomime in which harlequin has a leading role
References in periodicals archive ?
This print text provides hardly any information about the harlequinade proper, with rather cryptic descriptions such as this for Scene XI of "The Grand Interior of Burlington House, As fitted up for the fete, given to the Emperor Alexander: Characters out of Character.
The episode seems to unfold as in a harlequinade, with the indispensable help of signage to convey the topical satire: boorish Clown, perhaps, in the "flaunting" Tallyho representing "plebeian" (191) Birmingham, notorious for its "tawdry" mass-produced goods, with Harlequin Prime atop the dignified and patriotic Royal Mail, blowing a "shattering blast of triumph" on his coach trumpet "that was really too painfully full of derision" (192).
By mid-January, the pantomime was making a profit and any staff involved in working or maintaining the pantomime (such as the cellarmen working the harlequinade traps) were paid against house income.
It is a grand opera buffa that carries us full circle from the first American operas--those zany mixtures of humor, satire, elegance, and fantasy--to the comic opera, harlequinade, and melodrama, all in one magnificent package" (p.
From the slightly skewed vantage point required by Pirandellian humor, the Nazi-Fascist spectacle of power becomes an exercise in self-satire, a harlequinade absolutely unworthy of the passionate and uncritical devotion lavished on it by the gullible masses.
The word pantomime was first used in Britain in the 18th Century in Harlequinade shows.
The elongated concrete cores are linked by taut, horizontal membranes of clear glass and by harlequinade, or chequered, strata of yellow plywood and white glass spandrels.
No longer so much a harlequinade exercise in the artist-as-vagabond, de Jong's luridly colored gens du voyage have either fallen foul of the system or taken a last stand, symbolized by the now basketless little girl standing on the barrel once hoisted on an older youth's shoulder, her arms thrown hieratically into the air.
Such a harlequinade of letters poured into the journal from doctors that the editor eventually called a halt.
His brand of experimental hip-hop can draw you in with mesmerising belly dancing like on Rag & Bone Beat or blissed out She Binds Books, but just as quickly push you away with the jaw crunching noise of Black Hearted B*** which features Edinburgh MC Harlequinade or The Whisky Fist which samples bootleg tapes of The Jesus and Mary Chain's live noise.
Then a firecracker of a dancer, Dmitry Lysenko, exploded on to the stage with partner Svetlana Bekk, dancing the pas de deux from Harlequinade.
The most famous and popular of all the clowns in harlequinade and pantomime, Grimaldi was born in London in 1779.