HARM

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HARM

[¦āch¦ā¦är′em or härm]
(engineering)
high-aspect-ratio micromachining.
References in periodicals archive ?
In answer to Swidler's model, King proposed a model based on a Buddhist perspective that promotes selflessness in terms of interconnectedness, accompanied by the commitment to "an ethic of utter harmlessness to all forms of life.
The Church represents both East and West and the tenets of Christianity and Buddhism, with charitable activity and harmlessness as the fundamental teachings.
The abolitionist struggle to determine the meaning of the Greek Slave depended on the traffic and circulation of this bodily representation of slavery in hopes of a unique sort of slave "trade," one that exchanged the relative harmlessness of slave images for the grim reality of slavery.
its harmlessness (for instance, it risks harm, is "proximate"
They fulfill a mission whose harmlessness is evident, whose utility is palpable, and whose legitimacy is uncontested.
Thus, by linking homeschooling to military conscientious objection, are we dooming the former to the harmlessness of the latter, as argued by the authors above?
The goal of the temperature control during a composting process is to achieve to the greatest extent the harmlessness and stabilization of the compost materials after composting.
The effectiveness of fenugreek in symptoms of dysmenorrhea and its harmlessness have been observed (58).
Harm and harmlessness are indeed frequent exemplifiers of kusala and akusala acts, typically, though not here, specifying harm to oneself and/or to others (e.
51) The Septuagint, by using three different translations for pea, points to three aspects of the semantic field: akakos points to innocence and harmlessness, aphrton to an intellectual deficit, and nepios to infantility.
Novel food approval, contrary to popular opinion, is not an administrative chicanery; rather, it proves the safe consumption and harmlessness of a food substance.
Charles Nathan adduces, in a very ex cathedra style, his experiences of "the last few days," to prove the perfect harmlessness of the practice (12)