Harpy Eagle

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Harpy Eagle

 

(Harpia harpyja), a diurnal predatory bird of the family Accipitridae. Length, approximately 1 m; weight, up to 7.5 kg. It inhabits the tropical forests of Central and South America from Mexico to northern Argentina. It nests once every two years, building its nest in tall trees that rise above the forest. It lays a single egg and feeds its young for ten months. Its relatively short wings and long tail, characteristic of hawks, give the harpy eagle maneuverability in flight when searching for prey, which includes monkeys, sloths, opossums, and large parrots. Other large birds of prey of South America and Southeast Asia are also called harpy eagles.

REFERENCE

Fowler, J. M., and J. B. Cope. “Notes on the Harpy Eagle in British Guiana.” Auk, 1964, vol. 81, no. 3, pp. 257-73.
References in periodicals archive ?
Harpy Eagles typically make between two and four punctures to secure the posterior end of their prey, but the posterior end contained only one visible puncture on the right flank that was 60 mm anterior to the hip joint.
We also discuss two past Harpy Eagle-primate interactions and note two observations of Harpy Eagles with primate carcasses.
Predation by Harpy Eagles (Harpia harpyja) and predation on primates are rarely observed events.
We believe the pair in the BNR represents one of the northernmost known extant breeding pairs of Harpy Eagles in the Americas (Fig.
not introduced and unbanded) Harpy Eagles in the Bladen Nature Reserve (BNR) in the Southern Maya Mountains since December 2005.
The distributions of prey species differ between Central and South America, and prey choice by Harpy Eagles in Belize could vary from those of birds in South America.
The principal members of our team were Oswaldo Criollo, a Cofan Indian who had first discovered the nest some two years previously and monitored it ever since; Ruth Muniz, a Spanish researcher who has studied harpy eagles in Ecuador since 2000; and Alex Blanco, a Venezuelan veterinarian and the only person in the world who captures harpy eagles in the wild.
I thought of the four years of build-up to this moment--what the results could mean to the harpy eagle population, the effort of observation, the journey to the forest, Alex's air tickets from Venezuela, the donation of the transmitter from the Universidad de Alicante in Spain and their expectations, the hopes of the young Ecuadoran biologists who wanted to be part of an historic capture, and I looked at the eagle.
This was the first such recorder to be fitted to a harpy eagle, and the first one to be used on a raptor in South America.
Our observations of Harpy Eagles at the nest suggest that green branch collection is important for nest sanitation.
These observations support both (#'s 1 and 2) nest sanitation hypotheses for green branch collection by Harpy Eagles.
Our objectives were to: (1) use quantitative and qualitative observations of Harpy Eagle nesting behavior to explore the adaptive significance of green branch collecting, (2) report prey use by a pair of nesting Harpy Eagles in a fragmented forest habitat in Venezuela, and (3) report an unusual case of hatching synchrony and extended sibling competition.