vane

(redirected from harry)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to harry: Harry Houdini

vane

1. a flat plate or blade of metal mounted on a vertical axis in an exposed position to indicate wind direction
2. any one of the flat blades or sails forming part of the wheel of a windmill
3. any flat or shaped plate used to direct fluid flow, esp a stator blade in a turbine, etc.
4. a fin or plate fitted to a projectile or missile to provide stabilization or guidance
5. Ornithol the flat part of a feather, consisting of two rows of barbs on either side of the shaft

Vane

A metal banner that turns around a pivoted point, moving with the prevailing wind, to indicate the direction of the wind.

Vane

 

the lamellar part of a bird’s feather that lies on both sides of the shaft. It consists of numerous flattened formations, or barbs, that project from the shaft. Each barb has two rows of small lamellae, or barbules, equipped with hooked projections, or barbicels. The barbicels hook adjacent barbs tightly together, forming an elastic, air-resistant surface.

vane

[vān]
(aerospace engineering)
A device that projects ahead of an aircraft to sense gusts or other actions of the air so as to create impulses or signals that are transmitted to the control system to stabilize the aircraft.
(mechanical engineering)
A flat or curved surface exposed to a flow of fluid so as to be forced to move or to rotate about an axis, to rechannel the flow, or to act as the impeller; for example, in a steam turbine, propeller fan, or hydraulic turbine.
(navigation)
A sight on an instrument used for observing bearings, such as on a pelorus or azimuth circle.
(vertebrate zoology)
The expanded web part of a feather.

weather vane

A metal plate, often decorated, or in the shape of a figure or object, which rotates freely on a vertical spindle to indicate wind direction; usually located atop a spire or other elevated position on a building.

vane

vaneclick for a larger image
Vanes for pickup of data for angle of attack indicator and autopilot.
vane
An air-to-air missile.
vane
vane
i. A thin and more-or-less flat object intended to align itself with a stream or flow in a manner similar to that of the common weathercock, such as a device that projects ahead of an aircraft to sense gusts or other actions of the air to create impulses or signals that are transmitted to the control system to stabilize the aircraft.
ii. A fixed or movable surface used to control or give stability to a rocket or a missile.
iii. A blade or paddlelike object, often fashioned like an airfoil and usually one of several, that rotates about an axis, either being moved by a flow or creating a flow itself, such as the blade of a turbine, a fan, a rotary pump, an air compressor, etc.
iv. Any of certain stationary blades, plates, or the like that serve to guide or direct a flow, or to create a special kind of flow, as in (i) any of the blades in the nozzle ring of a gas turbine engine; (ii) any of the plates or slatlike objects that guide the flow in a wind tunnel; or (iii) a plate or fence projecting from a wing to prevent a span-wise flow. See nozzle guide vanes.
v. A bomb-arming vane. When a bomb is released from the aircraft, the vanes start rotating and, after a predetermined period, arm the bomb.
vi. A weather vane. A device that shows the direction in which the wind is blowing. See weather vane.
References in classic literature ?
You don't understand what friendship is, Harry," he murmured--"or what enmity is, for that matter.
I don't agree with a single word that you have said, and, what is more, Harry, I feel sure you don't either.
I sometimes think, Harry, that there are only two eras of any importance in the world's history.
My son Harry," mumbled Captain Hagberd, off his guard for once.
She heard Harry Hagberd say, "Hallo, dad," then a clanging clatter.
There isn't a single corner in the world, barring England, perhaps, where you could not find some man, or more likely woman, that would remember me for Harry Hagberd.
Three acres and a cow," cried Harry, emitting what the Parliamentary reports call an ironical cheer.
You'd better lead the yeoman party yourself," laughed Harry.
Cecil had been hesitating whether he should despise the villas or despise Sir Harry for despising them.
Sir Harry, beware of canaries: they spit the seed out through the bars of the cages and then the mice come.
Above stairs, the remainder of the evening passed cheerfully away; for the doctor was in high spirits; and however fatigued or thoughtful Harry Maylie might have been at first, he was not proof against the worthy gentleman's good humour, which displayed itself in a great variety of sallies and professional recollections, and an abundance of small jokes, which struck Oliver as being the drollest things he had ever heard, and caused him to laugh proportionately; to the evident satisfaction of the doctor, who laughed immoderately at himself, and made Harry laugh almost as heartily, by the very force of sympathy.
Harry Maylie, after the very first morning when he met Oliver coming laden home, was seized with such a passion for flowers, and displayed such a taste in their arrangement, as left his young companion far behind.