haulm


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haulm

, halm
1. the stems or stalks of beans, peas, potatoes, grasses, etc., collectively, as used for thatching, bedding, etc.
2. a single stem of such a plant
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the effects of frequency of supplementary concentrate mixture on digestion, rumen fermentation and voluntary feed intake of groundnut haulms.
Once the haulm (stems and leaves) reach approximately 22cm (9" ) the surrounding soil must be hoed up around the stems to a depth of about 12cm (5").
Delaying haulm destruction to maximise crop yield is an exceedingly risky strategy this season.
Always, as a matter of course, burn affected haulms and tubers otherwise they remain in the ground as the source of next year's infection Removing all blighted leaves will reduce the spread of the disease, but the best insurance if there is a whiff of blight about, or there are two days when the temperature does not fall below 10C and relative humidity stays above 75%, is to spray with Bordeaux mixture, or an approved proprietary brand early in July and thereafter fortnightly until the middle of September.
39 g/d over 56 d by goats fed sole groundnut haulms had been reported by Ikhatua and Adu [8] while, a range of 40.
Ian Morrison, via email AIF all the haulms - the green growth above ground - have died back, wait for a bright, sunny day then dig them up carefully and leave them on the surface of the soil.
Ian Morrison, Darlington, Co Durham CAROL SAYS: If all the haulms - the green growth above ground - have died back, wait for a bright, sunny day then dig them up carefully and leave them on the surface of the soil.
Evaluation of complete rations containing groundnut haulms, banyan (Ficus bengalensis) tree leaves and red gram straw in sheep.
So as soon as the haulms die back, stop watering your spuds and leave them in soil or compost until you want to use them.
According to Devendra (1997), three major categories of feeds are: i) Pastures and forages--these include native and improved grasses, herbaceous legumes and multipurpose trees ii) Crop residues (dry fodder)--cereal straws, stovers, groundnut haulms etc.
Finish harvesting potatoes now as potato blight has been around on the haulms and, if left can destroy the potatoes as well.
The tall, leggy haulms cannot withstand any more wettings and have fallen to their dreaded enemy, the blight.