hawser


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hawser

Nautical a large heavy rope

hawser

[′hȯz·ər]
(naval architecture)
A large rope or cable, usually over 5 inches (13 centimeters) in diameter, generally used to tow or moor a ship or secure it at a dock.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hawser SP, Bouchillon SK, Hoban DJ, Badal RE, Hsueh P-R, Paterson DL.
Once the hawser was in place, two feet above the tail-block, a breeches buoy suspended from the hawser was hauled to the wreck.
Anita Hawser T he warning signs have been there for some time in global equities marke
Biofilm growth was analyzed with MIT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium Bromidel-metabolic assay as described by Hawser and Douglas (1994).
The sunflower moors on its eight-foot wrist-thick hawser.
Young RC, Hawser DM, Anderson T, Fisher RI, Joffe E, De Vita VT Jr.
Grandparents and children alike can take part in a hawser tug of war and revive themselves by bobbing for peaches.
The answer is cordage, the general name for thread, string, cord, rope, hawser, and cable.
Some experts predict that as much as 90% of the world's computing and data storage will be done via the cloud in five to 10 years, while cloud computing applications are predicted to experience a fivefold growth in the next five years (Anita Hawser, "Cloud Control: Businesses Looking for Cost-effective Data and IT Infrastructure Solutions Are Increasingly Finding the Answer Is in the Cloud," Global Finance, December 2009).
screening, which got off to a late start, the co-stars were ready and raring to mingle with guests in the Hawser Patron Lounge.
A chain that was part of the hawser - a line connecting the workboat to the dredger - broke, causing the line to snap back and hit the deckhand, the Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) said in a report.
Universal Coverage, by Daniel Putkowski, paperback, 350pp, $16, ISBN 97809815959-4-8, Hawser Press, 2009.